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Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain

Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email By Gabrielle Kassel, August 20, 2020 August 20, 2020 Carpal tunnel syndrome, one of the most phonetically pleasing health conditions in the English language, affects the wrists. As many as 10 million Americans — that’s about 3 percent of the population — have some degree of this condition. Carpal tunnel can cause quite a bit of pain and discomfort, and considering how much we use our wrists in day-to-day life, it’s important to address this condition if it’s affecting your quality of life. Stay tuned for the essential info, including five expert-approved exercises designed to help manage pain. What is it, exactly? Carpal tunnel syndrome happens when your median nerve, which runs along the underside of your forearm and up your hand through a tunnel of nine tendons called the carpal tunnel, gets squeezed or compressed. Experts aren’t totally sure what causes carpal tunnel, but one of the leading hypotheses is that it’s a type of anatomic compression and/or inflammation around the tendons. Symptoms of carpal tunnel There are many degrees of carpal tunnel syndrome, ranging from annoying to excruciating. Look out for these symptoms: • numbness, tingling, or jolts of pain in your thumb and first three fingers • pain that travels up and down your forearm • dull, constant, or even severe wrist pain • new-onset grip weakness 5 daily exercises that might do the trick Before we get into the exercises, we should note that the first line of defense in managing carpal tunnel is determining that you actually have it. And the only way to do that is by seeing a professional. How often should you do them? The recommended scheme in the exercises below was set by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. However, Alejandro Badia, M.D., board-certified hand, wrist, and upper extremity orthopedic surgeon is adamant you speak with a healthcare provider before starting this regimen. And if you experience any sort of sharp pain, stop immediately.   1. Wrist extension stretch Recommended reps: 5 Times per day: 4 Times per week: 5–7 “There’s some evidence that wrist extension and flexion exercises help widen the carpal tunnel a tiny little bit,” says Badia. How to do it 1. Straighten arm and bend wrist so fingers are pointed up and perpendicular to your forearm. (This should look like a “stop” sign.) 2. Use your opposite hand to apply pressure across your palm, pulling fingers toward you. 3. Hold for 15–30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.   2. Wrist flexion stretch Recommended reps: 5 Times per day: 4 Times per week: 5–7 Surprise: The wrist flexion stretch is basically the exact opposite of the wrist extension stretch. How to do it 1. Straighten arm and bend wrist down so palm is facing your body and fingers are pointed toward the floor, perpendicular to your forearm. 2. Use your opposite hand to pull fingers toward your body. 3. Hold for 15–30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.   3. Medial nerve glide Times per day: 10–15 Times per week: 6–7 True to its name, this exercise is all about getting the nerve moving and grooving through some gentle thumb manipulation. Doctor of physical therapy and founder of Just Move Therapy Dr. Marcia Darbouze, PT, DPT, adds this move is “awesome for relief.” How to do it 1. Start with wrist in a neutral position, palm facing away from you, and fingers curled into a fist. 2. Open your fist into a flat palm, with thumb glued against pointer finger, so wrist is parallel to the floor. 3. Bend wrist back toward you so the backs of your hand and fingers are facing your face. 4. “Unglue” thumb, extending it as far as you can away from palm. 5. Flip entire forearm so you’re now staring at palm and the underside of forearm 6. Use your other hand to gently pull down on thumb, giving it a nice stretch (but don’t pull too hard). 7. Repeat with the other hand.   4. Vertical tendon glides Recommended reps: 5–10 Times per day: 2 or 3 Times per week: Daily “Vertical and horizontal tendon gliding exercises really do seem to help people,” says Badia. How to do it 1. Start with hand in “stop” position, wrist neutral, and fingers straight. 2. Bend fingertips toward the floor so they’re touching your palm. Hold for 3 seconds. 3. Curl fingers into fist, with thumb on the outside. Hold for 3 seconds. 4. Repeat with the other hand.   5. Horizontal tendon glides Recommended reps: 5–10 Times per day: 2 or 3 Times per week: Daily And last one… How to do it 1. Start with hand in “stop” position. 2. Bend at bottom knuckle so fingers are perpendicular to palm. Hold for 3 seconds. 3. Touch fingertips to palm by hinging at middle knuckles. Hold for 3 seconds. 4. Repeat with the other hand These exercises aren’t for everyone According to physical therapist Lauren Jarmusz, these exercises may actually bring on some of your carpal tunnel symptoms. She recommends doing 1 rep of each and waiting 10 minutes to see if your symptoms resolve. If the pain and discomfort don’t ease, discontinue the exercises and make an appointment to see your doctor. What else can I do for my carpal tunnel? The protocols will vary based on your pain level but could include any combo of the following: Adjust your positioning At your desk 8+ hours a day? The quickest remedy for folks whose symptoms are aggravated by their job is a desk makeover. “Set up your workstation so that the monitor is eye level and an arm’s length away, the elbows are in line with the wrists, the mouse is nearby, the thighs are parallel to the floor, and the feet are planted,” suggests Darbouze. Splints “For early carpal tunnel syndrome, it’s very common for doctors to prescribe that a patient wear a

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What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email By Sanctuary magazine staff November 2021 Carpal tunnel, which is a common nerve compression disorder causing pain, tingling and numbness in the wrist, hand and fingers, is an occupational disease, right? “Wrong,” says Alejandro Badia, M.D., a noted hand and upper limb specialist and founder and chief medical officer of the Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW®. He brands claims that carpal tunnel syndrome develops because of overuse of the wrist a “myth, much like saying cracking your knuckles leads to arthritis or eating chicken soup will cure the common cold.” The syndrome occurs when the median nerve, which extends from the forearm to the hand through the narrow tunnel of bone and ligaments on the wrist’s palm side, becomes pinched and inflamed from irritated tendons or other conditions that cause swelling and thickening of the connective tissue surrounding the nerve in the wrist canal. Dr. Badia explains that symptoms begin gradually and worsen over time. These symptoms include wrist or forearm pain; persistent burning, tingling or numbness in the fingers; and decreased hand and wrist strength. “CTS is an extremely common, readily diagnosable medical condition. However, it is often misunderstood, even by the scientific community,” Badia says. Recent studies bear him out. For example, the latest research, published in a July 2020 issue of Nature Communications indicates that genetics may play a much greater role in CTS than once thought. In analyzing nearly 100 cases of CTS in two families, scientists report finding mutations of a gene “highly expressed” in the tissue around the median nerve. The mutated gene is believed responsible for promoting an accumulation of cells that cause the connective tissue to thicken and press on the nerve. Study results could eventually lead to new treatments and preventive measures.  But genetics is only one culprit in a disorder considered multifactorial. The National Institutes of Health reports women are three times more likely than men to experience carpal tunnel syndrome. The higher risk among females is likely due to their anatomically narrower wrist channels and the disorder’s suspected relationship toVariations in the levels of these substances – such as what occurs in menopause and pregnancy – can lead to fluid retention and thicken the extracellular matrix in the wrist, resulting in pressure on the median nerve,” Badia says. Researchers say that other conditions increasing risk among both sexes are injuries to the wrist, obesity, inflammatory and nerve-related diseases like arthritis and diabetes, and a dysfunctional thyroid. The thyroid controls metabolism – how the body utilizes energy from food. Be cautious of hand position during sleep. Sleeping on flexed hands allows fluid to pool in the wrist canal. If directed by an orthopedic specialist, wear a wrist splint at night to relieve pressure on the wrist canal. Be aware of posture while walking or sitting Hunching places strain on arms, wrists and hands. Avoid bending the wrist too high or too low. Take breaks! Take Breaks when doing any prolonged activities involving hands or wrists Keep hands warm! Keep hands warm in a cold environment. Cold hands are a risk factor for CTS. Hormonal Changes can affect your hands! Because hormonal changes can cause fluid retention at night, women, in particular, should talk to their physicians about taking prescribed doses of vitamin B6, which some scientists believe decreases fluid in the carpal canal. “Repetitive wrist activities, such as typing on a computer keyboard or handling a cash register, may further aggravate CTS symptoms but are not linked to actual development of the disorder. Clinical research has failed to demonstrate conclusively any definned relationship between CTS and constant use of the wrist,” Dr. Badia indicates. “The ‘myth’ that workplace responsibilities somehow cause CTS has resulted in the misdirection of billions of dollars into workers’ compensation to treat a condition that commonly occurs in the general population. Alejandro Badia, M.DChief medical Officer at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center Also debunked by Badia are false beliefs that the only recourse for CTS is surgery, which frequently proves unsuccessful. In fact, initial, recommended therapies tend to be conservative. Depending on the severity of the condition, treatments can involve wrist splints at night, anti-inflammatory medications, performed in as little as ten minutes in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia. It involves dividing the ligament at the roof of the carpal tunnel to increase space in the canal and take pressure off the nerve,” Badia explains. “Postoperative complications are minimal and long-term results excellent.” He adds that recovery from this simple procedure is easy. For instance, a cardiothoracic surgeon had him perform the release on the morning he was attending a conference near Miami. Three days later, this same cardiothoracic surgeon flew to the Southwest city where he practices and performed a major thoracic surgery using the dominant affected hand. Numbness was gone. Carpal tunnel syndrome cannot always be prevented, but risks and symptoms may be reduced. Badia offers these tips to protect hands and wrists: “Most importantly, patients who are experiencing the classic symptoms of CTS should contact an orthopedic specialist as quickly as possible. If left untreated, the syndrome can eventually make it difficult to form a fist, coordinate fingers and do simple, manual tasks like buttoning a shirt or blouse. The disorder may even lead to a wasting of muscle at the base of the thumb and permanent nerve damage,” Badia cautions. View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Patient Articles Wrist Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Patient Articles Wrist What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand

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Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness

Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email (HealthNewsDigest.com) – Miami, FL, June 4, 2019 – It is natural to want to ascribe a simple cause to a problem. If your wrist hurts or your hands are numb it must be because of typing. However, according to Alejandro Badia MD, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in treatment of the upper limbs, including hands and wrists says “don’t blame that painful wrist on any physical requirements of your job, including time spent on a computer keyboard or other device. That’s because the problem – carpal tunnel syndrome – is more likely due to hormonal changes, underlying inflammatory diseases or simple wrist anatomy”. The syndrome occurs when the median nerve, extending from the forearm to the hand through the narrow tunnel of bone and ligaments on the wrist’s palm side, becomes pinched and inflamed from irritated tendons or other conditions that cause swelling in the wrist canal. Symptoms, which begin gradually and worsen over time, include wrist or forearm pain; persistent burning, tingling or numbness in the fingers; and decreased hand strength, explains Dr. Badia, founder and chief medical officer of the Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW®, a group of walk-in orthopedic clinics. The National Institutes of Health reports women are three times more likely than men to experience carpal tunnel syndrome. The higher risk among females is likely due to their anatomically narrower wrist channels and the disorder’s suspected relationship to metabolic and hormonal-level changes during pregnancy and menopause, Dr. Badia says. “Hormones are chemical substances that impact every organ and structure in the body. Variations in the levels of these substances – such as what occurs in menopause and pregnancy — can lead to fluid retention and thicken the extracellular matrix in the wrist, resulting in pressure on the median nerve,” Dr. Badia says. Statistics indicate that 20 percent or more of pregnant women develop carpal tunnel syndrome. Other conditions increasing risk among both sexes, researchers say, are wrist injury, inflammatory and nerve-related diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes, and a dysfunctional thyroid. The thyroid controls metabolism – how the body utilizes energy from food. What studies fail to show conclusively is any defined relationship between constant use of the wrist and development of carpal tunnel syndrome, Dr. Badia indicates. “Repetitive wrist activities — like typing on a computer keyboard or handling a cash register — may further aggravate symptoms but are not linked to actual development of the syndrome,” he says. “The ‘myth’ that workplace responsibilities cause the problem has resulted in misdirection of billions of dollars into workers’ compensation to treat a condition that commonly occurs in the general population and is unrelated to on-the-job requirements.” In fact, carpal tunnel syndrome is described as far back as 1025 AD when medieval Persian physician, Avicenna, correctly detailed the wrist problem in his book Canon of Medicine,according to authors of a 2018 article in Integrative Medicine Research. Avicenna suggested that chronic nerve impingement in the wrist is due to both physical disorders and lifestyle factors, such as improper nutrition and lack of sleep. Whatever causes the syndrome, Dr. Badia encourages early diagnosis. “If left untreated, the syndrome can eventually make it difficult for patients to form a fist, coordinate their fingers and do simple, manual tasks like buttoning a shirt or blouse. The disorder may even lead to a wasting of muscle at the base of the thumb,” he says. Initial, recommended therapies tend to be conservative, involving wrist splints at night, anti-inflammatory medications and injection of corticosteroids. Some studies have supported the use of vitamin B6 and or B12. Should the problem persist, the nerve compression prove severe enough or a physician determine the syndrome is causing deterioration of hand muscles, then minor procedure may be proposed. “The procedure is performed in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia. It involves dividing the ligament that serves as the roof of the carpal tunnel to increase space in the wrist canal and take pressure off the nerve,” Dr. Badia says. “Using a recent treatment breakthrough called endoscopic release, the surgeon can divide the carpal tunnel ligament through a tiny cut in the crease of the wrist without making a larger, open incision,” Carpal tunnel syndrome cannot always be prevented, but risks may be reduced. Dr. Badia offers these tips: · Be cautious of hand position during sleep. When sleeping the hand is typically closer to the heart which can cause fluid to pool in the wrist canal. . · Relax grip when using tools, pens or other items. · Be aware of posture while walking or sitting. Hunching places strain on arms, wrists and hands. Avoid bending the wrist too high or too low. · Take breaks when doing any prolonged activities involving hands or wrists. · Keep hands warm in a cold environment. Cold hands are a risk factor for developing carpal tunnel syndrome.   Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, internationally renowned hand and upper-limb surgeon and founder of Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW®, a walk-in orthopedic care clinic. He is a member of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, American Association for Hand Surgery and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He is a specialist in treating all problems related to the hand and upper extremity including trauma, sports injury, joint reconstruction, nerve injuries and arthroscopic surgeries. View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, common conditions, Cubital tunnel, cubital tunnel syndrome, endoscopic, english, Hand, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, endoscopic carpal tunnel release, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Renowned hand and upper limb surgeon, Dr. Alejandro

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Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain

Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email The Abaconian Staff May 15, 2016 According to the National Institutes of Health, carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common wrist conditions that exist with over 3 million cases reported yearly. The everyday symptoms that are easily ignored include burning, tingling, or itching numbness in the palm of the hand and index), the feeling of swelling without it being apparent, or the feeling of pins and needles, hand clumsiness or hand and wrist weakness. Although many people suffer from this condition, most do not know that there is a minimally invasive procedure that can eliminate these symptoms. This syndrome, which affects the hand and wrist, is caused by excessive pressure on the median nerve, which then causes a numbness and tingling feeling in the thumb, index, middle and ring or swelling (during pregnancy or after trauma /injury), tendon irritation (excessive or repetitive hand use), nerve changes (diabetes, hypothyroidism, or alcoholism),  arthritis, bone changes from arthritis, cysts or tumors. More severe cases may even experience different degrees of pain and discomfort as the muscle in the thumb becomes weak and decreases in size. syndrome, which affects the hand and wrist, is caused by excessive pressure on the median nerve, which then causes a numbness and tingling feeling in the thumb, index, middle and ring or swelling (during pregnancy or after trauma /injury), tendon irritation (excessive or repetitive hand use), nerve changes (diabetes, hypothyroidism, or alcoholism),  arthritis, bone changes from arthritis, cysts or tumors. More severe cases may even experience different degrees of pain and discomfort as the muscle in the thumb becomes weak and decreases in size. Dr. Alejandro Badia renowned Upper Extremity and Hand Surgeon, Medical Director of the Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and founder of OrthoNOW in Doral, Florida, specializes in minimally invasive procedures such as carpal tunnel release, which reduces pressure on the median nerve to alleviate the problem. The median nerve runs from the forearm to the carpal tunnel, which is composed of transverse carpal ligaments and carpal bones. It controls thumb movement and provides sensation from the palm side of the thumb “Endoscopy is minimally invasive, meaning patients are able to start their recovery sooner. By leaving little to no scarring, it reduces the risk of infection, which allows the patient to return to their life quickly and with a minimal amount of discomfort,” said Dr. Badia. Unlike open procedures, which are most common in the Caribbean, endoscopic procedures are much less painful, and the recovery and rehabilitation is a lot shorter. Patients from The Bahamas often travel to Miami for this reason. The procedure is done with local anesthesia and requires a three-day stay. Patients who undergo the procedure are able to use their hand immediately. View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Patient Articles Wrist Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, common conditions, Cubital tunnel, cubital tunnel syndrome, endoscopic, english, Hand, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Scientific Publications Wrist Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, endoscopic carpal tunnel release, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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Renowned hand and upper limb surgeon, Dr. Alejandro Badia from Miami, visits Freeport

Renowned hand and upper limb surgeon, Dr. Alejandro Badia from Miami, visits Freeport Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Submitted by Ana Garcia Thursday, 29 September 2011 07:17 MIAMI, FL – Dr. Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, and worldrenowned Hand and Upper Limb Surgeon, President of the ISSPOR TH (International Society for Sport Traumatology of the Hand), returns to Bahamas, this time to Freeport invited for a Medical Conference. Dr. Badia has recently performed three successful surgeries on the renowned biker Guilherme Berg (GUI BERG). “In 2010, I broke my right collarbone in the middle of the championship and I thought my year was over! I went back to see Dr. Badia, who six months earlier treated successfully my broken right wrist. He scheduled my surgery for the next day in his state of the art facility. One month and a half later I was racing again…. It was one of my best years in motorcycle racing so far; I won the Middleweight and Heavyweight Super Sport class, Middleweight Superbike class, CCS National Race of the Champions!! This year I broke my collarbone again! This time was the left one… Due to last year’s excellent results I went straight back to Dr. Badia’s center “again”. This time the fracture was much worse and still, barely a month later I’m back on the bike! – Affirms Mr. Berg. Dr. Badia says – “ It is extremely satisfactory when a professional athlete come to see me. It is imperative for them to be appropriately treated, to heal and go back to their intense routine. It is my challenge and my passion to succeed.” – Badia has a long history of treating high level tennis and golf competitors, NFL and NBA athletes. Dr. Badia has just been nominated one of the top 45 great hand and upper extremity surgeons to know by Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine Review. Alejandro Badia is in conversations with leading Brazilian medical authorities to organize a sports medicine conference prior to the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro. Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS is a hand and upper extremity surgeon. He studied physiology at Cornell University and obtained his medical degree at NYU, where he also trained in orthopedics. A hand fellowship at Alleghany General Hospital in Pittsburgh was followed by an AO trauma fellowship in Freiburg, Germany. He runs an active international hand fellowship, serves on the editorial board of two hand journals, and organizes a yearly Miami meeting for surgeons and therapists that are devoted to upper limb arthroscopy and arthroplasty (www.miamihandcourse.com). This international meeting is held at the world-renowned Miami Anatomical Research Center (M.A.R.C.), the world’s largest surgical cadaveric training lab that Dr. Badia co-founded in 2005. In 2008, he completed the Badia Hand to Shoulder Center, a fully integrated clinical facility for the upper limb encompassing digital radiography, MRI extremity imaging, Integral rehabilitation facility and the Surgery Center in Doral. More recently, Dr. Badia inaugurated OrthoNOW, the first immediateorthopedic care center in South Florida which is staffed by surgeons from the International Orthopedic Group (IOG), a group of surgeons from lower extremity, upper limb and spine subspecialties who also treat elective orthopedic problems in international patients. He is member of the ASSH, AAHS, AAOS as well as honorary member of many foreign hand surgery societies. View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Patient Articles Wrist Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, common conditions, Cubital tunnel, cubital tunnel syndrome, endoscopic, english, Hand, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Scientific Publications Wrist Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, endoscopic carpal tunnel release, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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Sports Injuries Of The Hand And Wrist: Renowned Orthopedic Surgeon Attends AAHS 2015 In Bahamas

Sports Injuries Of The Hand And Wrist: Renowned Orthopedic Surgeon Attends AAHS 2015 In Bahamas Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email MIAMI – Jan. 12, 2015 – PRLog — Dr. Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, Hand & Upper Limb Surgeon, who was recently proclaimed as “One of the Top Hand Surgeons in the United States”, Founder and Medical Director of Badia Hand to Shoulder Center, spokesperson and advocate on the latest in orthopedic technology: “ARPWAVE Neuro Therapy”, CEO of the OrthoNOW® Orthopedic Urgent Care franchise network, and past president of the ISSPORTH (International Society for Sport Traumatology of the Hand), arrives in Nassau, Bahamas serving as one of the opening speakers at the American Association for Hand Surgery 2015 Annual Meeting. This prominent meeting will begin with a notable presentation by Dr. Badia, on the latest in “Maximizing Economics in a Changing Health Care Environment” and “Sports Injuries of the Hand and Wrist”at Atlantis Hotel, Paradise Island on January 21st, 2015 at 7:00am. In today’s constantly changing health care environment, understanding and maximizing economics while enhancing patient hand and wrist care can be challenging. During this meeting, Dr. Alejandro Badia will be identifying the barriers to navigating through the ever-changing health care environment by presenting a solution of coordinated, convenient, responsive, affordable and expert orthopedic urgent care, and speak on common athletic injuries of the hand and wrist. Dr. Badia will also take this opportunity to attend various meetings with the media and local prominent figures. “I’m so pleased to be in beautiful Bahamas. My mission has been, and always is to create educational synergy and to expose great technology that allows minimally invasive procedure accelerates recovery, prevents some surgical procedures, and shortens post-surgical rehabilitation. This system provides our patients, mostly athletes who depend so much on their physical excellence, with better healthcare and better recovery methods and options.”–states Dr. Badia, Hand and Upper Limb Surgeon at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center in Miami, Florida. Badia has successfully performed surgery on many professional athletes from around the world. Traumatic (acute) refers to any specific, sharp pain that is of rapid onset or pain that results from a specific traumatic incident such as an athletic injury. Traumatic injuries are more commonly seen in athletes who participate in certain sports that require a higher level of contact (i.e., football, hockey, or wrestling). The most common traumatic fracture injury in the athletic population is found in the fingers and include joint dislocations, sprains, muscle strains, broken bones, tendon inflammation, and ligament tears. “Major fractures of the hand or wrist occur only during high-speed contact or in older athletes who may have osteoporosis.  Complex fractures below the elbow can occur and there is a great variation in the fracture patterns.  It is important that an upper extremity specialist evaluate these injuries, as recovery of full wrist and hand range of motion is often difficult.  Fractures of the upper arm (humerus) may also result from this injury and can even extend into the shoulder joint.” – States Dr. Alejandro Badia, Leading Hand and Upper Extremity Surgeon at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center. Overuse (chronic) injuries are more likely to occur in athletes who engage in sports that require them to repeat a particular movement (i.e., baseball, soccer, tennis, or golf). Overuse injuries are likely to be stress induced and include tendon inflammation and dislocation, nerve injury, and overuse stress fractures. Chronic injuries have a higher tendency to develop long-term effects. However, long-term disability is less likely to occur from overuse injuries than from traumatic injuries. An athlete’s performance may significantly diminish, if the chronic injuries are left untreated. Surgery may be required if the overuse chronic injuries persists and continues to develop over time. “Arthroscopy for hand and wrist pathology is a minimally invasive surgical technique used to explore a joint from within. Tiny incisions are used to insert a fiberoptic instrument which serves as a camera to the inside of a joint and allows to not only diagnose a problem but often times concludes what definitive treatment should would be best for the patient. This is opposed to the more standard technique of open joint surgery, which can result in increased scarring and prolonged recovery time. ” – States Dr. Alejandro Badia. Badia has a long history of treating high-level tennis, polo and golf competitors, NFL and NBA athletes. Dr. Badia was nominated in 2012 as “one of the top 45 great hand and upper extremity surgeons” by Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine Review. Alejandro Badia is in conversations with leading Brazilian medical authorities to organize a sports medicine conference prior to the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro. Article Reference: https://www.prlog.org/12413361-sports-injuries-of-the-hand-and-wrist-renowned-orthopedic-surgeon-attends-aahs-2015-in-bahamas.html View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Sports Injuries Of The Hand And Wrist: Renowned Orthopedic Surgeon Attends AAHS 2015 In Bahamas Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine Blog Renowned orthopaedic expert attends 2015 Hand Surgery meeting in the Bahamas arthroscopy, Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, Elbow Fracture, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine Patient Articles Wrist Wrist Pain in Golfers and Tennis Players Bahamas, english, Golf, sports injuries, Sports Therapy, Tennis, wrist Blog Miami Hand Surgeon Visits the Bahamas AAHS, Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, blog, english, hand surgeon, sports injuries, Sports Therapy Want to see more articles? 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Renowned orthopaedic expert attends 2015 Hand Surgery meeting in the Bahamas

Renowned orthopaedic expert attends 2015 Hand Surgery meeting in the Bahamas – The Tribune Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email DR ALEJANDRO Badia, recognised as one of the top hand surgeons in the United States, will serve as a opening speaker at the American Association for Hand Surgery 2015 Annual Meeting scheduled to be held in Nassau tomorrow morning. He will be giving a presentation on the latest in “Maximising Economics in a Changing Health Care Environment” and “Sports Injuries of the Hand and Wrist” at Atlantis starting at 7am. During the meeting, Dr Badia, who is the founder and medical director of Badia Hand to Shoulder Centre in Florida, will be identifying the barriers to navigating through the ever-changing health care environment by presenting a solution of coordinated, convenient, responsive, affordable and expert orthopaedic urgent care, and speak on common athletic injuries of the hand and wrist. “I’m so pleased to be in beautiful Bahamas,” he said. “My mission has been and always is to create educational synergy and to expose great technology that allows minimally invasive procedure accelerates recovery, prevents some surgical procedures, and shortens post-surgical rehabilitation. This system provides our patients, mostly athletes who depend so much on their physical excellence, with better healthcare and better recovery methods and options.” Dr Badia has successfully performed surgery on many professional athletes from around the world, including on high-level tennis, polo, golf, NFL and NBA players. “Major fractures of the hand or wrist occur only during high-speed contact or in older athletes who may have osteoporosis,” he said. “Complex fractures below the elbow can occur and there is a great variation in the fracture patterns. It is important that an upper extremity specialist evaluate these injuries, as recovery of full wrist and hand range of motion is often difficult. Fractures of the upper arm (humerus) may also result from this injury and can even extend into the shoulder joint.” Traumatic (acute) refers to any specific, sharp pain that is of rapid onset or pain that results from a specific traumatic incident such as an athletic injury. Traumatic injuries are more commonly seen in athletes who participate in certain sports that require a higher level of contact (football, hockey or wrestling). The most common traumatic fracture injury in the athletic population is found in the fingers and include joint dislocations, sprains, muscle strains, broken bones, tendon inflammation and ligament. Overuse (chronic) injuries are more likely to occur in athletes who engage in sports that require them to repeat a particular movement (baseball, soccer, tennis or golf). Overuse injuries are likely to be stress induced and include tendon inflammation and dislocation, nerve injury, and overuse stress fractures. Chronic injuries have a higher tendency to develop long-term effects. However, long-term disability is less likely to occur from overuse injuries than from traumatic injuries. An athlete’s performance may significantly diminish, if the chronic injuries are left untreated. Surgery may be required if the overuse chronic injuries persists and continues to develop over time. “Arthroscopy for hand and wrist pathology is a minimally invasive surgical technique used to explore a joint from within. Tiny incisions are used to insert a fibreoptic instrument which serves as a camera to the inside of a joint and allows to not only diagnose a problem but often times concludes what definitive treatment should would be best for the patient. This is opposed to the more standard technique of open joint surgery, which can result in increased scarring and prolonged recovery time,” said Dr Badia. Dr Badia was nominated in 2012 as “one of the top 45 great hand and upper extremity surgeons” by Becker’s Orthopaedic & Spine Review. He is also in conversations with leading Brazilian medical authorities to organise a sports medicine conference prior to the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro. As time goes on, Badia hopes to see his line of medicine considered a primary source of medical care. “There’s so much to think about when you get injured, and seeing the right person quickly can make a big difference. If you can save money along the way, it’s really a win-win,” he says. “We are a more cost-effective solution with the potential to make a huge dent on the overall health care system.” Article Reference: http://www.tribune242.com/news/2015/jan/20/renowned-orthopaedic-expert-attends-2015-hand-surg/ Related Articles: Blog Patient Articles Wrist Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, common conditions, Cubital tunnel, cubital tunnel syndrome, endoscopic, english, Hand, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Scientific Publications Wrist Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, endoscopic carpal tunnel release, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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Renowned Hand And Wrist Surgeon Discusses Athletic Wrist Injuries
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Miami Hand Surgeon Visits the Bahamas

“My mission has been, and always is to create educational synergy and to expose great technology that allows minimally invasive procedure, accelerates recovery, prevents some surgical procedures, and shortens post-surgical rehabilitation.”   Dr. Alejandro Badia Transforming Athlete Care: Dr. Badia’s Renowned Expertise in Hand and Upper Limb Surgery Sets a New Standard “I make myself very available to my colleagues, not only here in The Bahamas but around the Caribbean.  I see a lot of patients from Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago.  So, what we do through my website, I’ll have a lot of colleagues send me an x-ray and say ‘What are your thoughts on this?’ Badia also mentioned that distal-radius (broken wrist) is one of the most common adult fracture that would need surgery. “That’s an extremely common fracture.  You see it a lot in older patients because of osteoporosis and you see it in athletes from a high-energy injury such as a fall.  And even in labor, people fall from a ladder or roof.  So, these are all very common. “But the difference in an athlete is they need to get back to their former level of functioning.  It’s important that they have the optimal treatment.  But today at the hotel I saw a lady who had a fracture several weeks ago and still hasn’t had surgery. “These things should be done within the first week or 10 days of the injury, because after that the bone starts to heal in the wrong position… So, again, it’s all a matter of awareness.”   MORE IN THE BAHAMAS: Dr. Alejandro Badia: Pioneering Orthopedic Care and Education in Hand and Upper Limb Surgery Dr. Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, hand and upper limb surgeon was one of the keynote speakers at the 2015 American Association for Hand Surgery Annual Meeting this past Wednesday. The meeting took place at the Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island; however, Badia was  available to speak with The Freeport News briefly. “I’m so pleased to be in beautiful Bahamas. My mission has been, and always is to create educational synergy and to expose great technology that allows minimally invasive procedure, accelerates recovery, prevents some surgical procedures, and shortens post-surgical rehabilitation. “This system provides our patients, mostly athletes who depend so much on their physical excellence, with better healthcare and better recovery methods and options,” stated Dr. Badia, Hand and Upper Limb Surgeon at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center in Miami, Florida. Badia has successfully performed surgery on many professional athletes from around the world. Badia, MD, FACS, Hand & Upper Limb Surgeon, was recently proclaimed, “One of the top hand surgeons in the United States.” He is the founder and Medical Director of Badia Hand to Shoulder Center, spokesperson and advocate on the latest in orthopedic technology: “ARPWAVE Neuro Therapy” and CEO of the OrthoNOW® Orthopedic Urgent Care franchise network. Badia is also the past president of the International Society for Sport Traumatology of the Hand (ISSPORTH), which is a society that came into being to educate athletes into seeing the right type of doctor when it comes to matters of the hand and wrist. He noted that a part of his address was the common injuries to the hand and wrist that athletes can suffer, and also the proper ways of seeking the right help and rehabilitation. Badia stated that injuries to the hand and wrist, is a topic not commonly spoken about when it comes to athletes. “It’s kind of a rarely discussed subject.  We always talk about hands and knees and ankle injuries and maybe shoulders, but we rarely talk about hand and wrist, and that’s what the symposium was about. “One of the issues is when an athlete, it doesn’t have to be a professional athlete, it can be people like you and I who like to do certain sports.  When we have a problem with our hand our wrist we often go to see a general doctor or we may even see an orthopedist, but the orthopedist doesn’t usually have that expertise in the hand or the wrist,” Badia indicated. Badia’s recommendation for anybody with a wrist injury or problem was simple, and that is seeking the right kind help as quickly as possible. “You really want to see the right type of doctor so if there is an acute injury, meaning a bad fall during sports, you want to get help pretty quickly and you want to make sure that the person you’re seeing has expertise in that area. “If you got something that’s been hurting for quite some time, and you’ve got the luxury of finding the right person, you can look online obviously, but you want to make sure it’s a specialist.  I think the problem is that the public thinks the orthopedic surgeon is a specialist.  We are, but now-a-days a spine surgeon is very different from what I do in hand wrist surgery which is different from a foot and ankle surgery. “So, my recommendation to people who want to get back to the same level of play for sports is that they seek the right person and I think the public, until now, didn’t really know there was a subspecialty called hand surgery,” Badia admitted. Badia made it known that he in fact knows a few, very good orthopedists in New Providence, but says it can be difficult to launch a sub-specialty in small countries. .“I know some very fine orthopedists here in Nassau, but the problem many times in smaller countries it’s hard to be able to develop a sub specialty because you may not have enough patients in the immediate area to focus on hand and wrist. “So, what I do recommend to the orthopedists is when they go to these conferences to attend some of the symposiums that are of that area which they’re a little weaker on.

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Get back in the saddle Dr. Badia hand to shoulder surgeon treats polo athletes
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Polo & Equestrian Injuries to the Upper Limbs

“GET BACK IN THE SADDLE” – Polo & Equestrian Injuries to the Upper Limbs   This article was first published on Polo Barbados 2014 Edition. You can read here testimonials from polo players such as Monique Archer and Danny Atwell. The article is still very relevant today not only for polo players but also for golf players and other competitive and recreational sports’ players. If you are suffering pain in your upper limbs, no matter the level of injury, please read on, and call our office. You are never late for a precise treatment that would maximize your return to full function.   While competitive and recreational polo rely significantly upon core and lower extremity strength and endurance, it is actually the upper extremity, which is usually involved in traumatic, or overuse injuries. This is due to the simple fact that the legs are constrained in the stirrups, and the participant has to use the upper limb to cushion a fall and hopefully roll. Besides injuries from a fall or collision, there are a wide variety of both traumatic and atraumatic injuries involving the hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder region due to the demanding use of the mallet. Fortunately, most of these injuries will not prevent the athlete from returning to their sport. Studies on incidence of polo injuries indicate that 40% involve the upper limb with facial lacerations being the second most common category of injury. It is, of course, head and cervical spine injuries that are the true danger. Fortunately, the majority of these can be prevented by the simple use of a helmet and a face protector. However, protective gear is not practical for the upper limb since hand, wrist and elbow mobility is critical to performing the complex functions of riding and wielding the polo mallet. Traumatic injuries are most common. However, there are certain chronic injuries or conditions that can develop with the prolonged awkward position required during riding. Gripping the reigns and mallet can aggravate tendinitis usually involving the flexor tendons. Carpal tunnel syndrome, which is a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, can be exacerbated by the functions required of various equestrian related sports including polo. This requires evaluation by a hand surgeon or a neurologist and simple nerve conduction studieswill establish the diagnosis. The definitive treatment is, despite popular opinion, quite simple. This involves release of the transverse carpal ligament,which is a 5-minute outpatient surgical procedure under local anesthesia that is often done endoscopically. It is an unfortunate myth that the public has been led to believe that this is due to typing or computer use. Other chronic conditions such as lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) as well as shoulder bursitis can often be aggravated and conservative treatment usually suffices. While tennis and golf are traditionally associated to these chronic tendinopathies, gripping the reigns for hours can exacerbate the rider predisposed to this common condition. Failure of conservative treatment via ice, stretching or rehab is now an indication for the FAST procedure, a minimally invasive solution involving high energy ultrasound to eliminate the non-healing tendinous tissue, allowing competitors to get back to riding within 1-2 weeks. Osteoarthritis, particularly at the base of the thumb, as is common in middle-aged women, is aggravated by hand positioning during riding. The key for these chronic injuries is to be evaluated by a hand and upper extremity specialist because these diagnoses are often less clear-cut. The upper limb fractures are obviously less subtle in their diagnosis. The classic fracture discussed amongst horse riders and polo athletes is that of the collarbone, or clavicle. This occurs when the rider is thrown and the resultant force on the armand shoulder girdle leads to a break in this bone. Fortunately,most clavicle fractures are treated conservatively with a sling or in youngsters, a figure-eight-type brace, but it has become increasingly common to perform operative reduction of these fractures in order to achieve the best result. Lance Armstrong has brought this fracture to public eye when he returned to competitive cycling only 3 weeks after plate/screw stabilization of this common injury also ubiquitous in cycling. Muchmore frequent than the commonly seen collarbone fracture are fractures about the wrist. Themost common would be a fracture of the distal radius, which is the spongy bone portion of the forearm where it meets the hand, and is far-and-away the most common fracture seen in the adult population in general. Treatment of these fractures has been revolutionized by a newmethod of fixation that was developed by my previous colleagues and I over 10 years ago. This involves an anatomic correction of the displaced bone and placement of a titanium plate and screws on the palmar aspect of the wrist that fixate the bone in the anatomic position. This allows for rapid recovery of function with essentially no long-termdeficit. Riders can return to their sport within several months after this injury using this new technique. However, themost classic polo injury about the wrist is the dreaded scaphoid fracture that is now managed with a compression screw to allow early motion and avoid stiffness and atrophy from prolonged casting. Until recently, there was a high incidence of scaphoid nonunions where the fracture never heals and leads to chronic issues in the wrist that needs more aggressive reconstruction. The current protocol of offering early percutaneous (tiny incision) screw fixation has minimized these complications and is preferable for the athlete who wants to get back in the saddle sooner. More subtle injuries to the wrist include ligament tears between the small carpal bones,which require an astute examination by a wrist specialist in order to establish a diagnosis. This is the most common cause of chronic wrist pain and is an entity that requires careful attention. The clinician should be experienced in wrist arthroscopy since this is the only sure way to establish the diagnosis, and can offer minimally invasive treatment. The smaller bones in the hand can also be involved in trauma from a fall or

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Artículos de Pacientes

Frequent Finger Injuries Among Cricketers

Frequent Finger Injuries Among Bahamian Cricketers Traumatic sports Injuries to the fingers and thumb are commonly occurring, occasionally career ending,  lesions to the competitive athlete, particularly cricket players. While often neglected, these injuries can occur in both contact and non-contact sports due to the crucial role the hand plays in many sporting activities. Unfortunately, these rarely receive much attention by the trainer or traditional team doctor, and it is only when the pain, swelling and functional deficit persist that the patient is referred to the hand surgeon specialist. The injury is often given the misnomer “jammed finger”, yet a clear diagnosis is rarely established, and this can have disastrous long term consequences to hand function and consequently, athletic performance. Digital injuries usually occur via an axial impaction mechanism in ball sports, while twisting injuries are seen more in contact sports. Regardless, the injuries can range from simple collateral ligament sprains, to tendon avulsions, or even complex articular fractures. The exact diagnosis will determine treatment and the time of return to sport. Thumb injuries overwhelmingly occur at the critical MCP joint, with ligamentous injuries requiring careful deliberation if operative intervention is needed. Early assessment will allow for the appropriate type and position of protective immobilization, often allowing continued play. More severe injuries, requiring surgical intervention, are also best treated early as this will lead to the best possible result and then allow faster return to competition.  Articular fractures of the PIP joint are good examples, in that delayed recognition will completely alter the treatment options. For example, a complex fracture dislocation may be amenable to dynamic external fixation if assessed within first ten days, but delayed evaluation and treatment may then require a less predictable reconstruction, such as hemi-hamate arthroplasty. Arthroscopy, particularly at the finger or thumb MCP joint, provides a less invasive and more accurate way of assessing chronic pain issues at this joint. Acute injury, such as a bony gamekeeper’s fracture, can also be more optimally treated via arthroscopy, avoiding the scar formation that can delay recovery and return of necessary motion. Finger injuries are commonly seen in Bahamian cricket athletes and early recognition is key. Team physicians, trainers, coaches and cricket players themselves must learn that optimal long term function depends on early, accurate diagnosis and the hand specialist should be involved from the onset. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Resection of Dorsal Wrist Ganglia Scientific Publications Wrist Resection of Dorsal Wrist Ganglia A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture Scientific Publications Wrist A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture Corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunion Scientific Publications Wrist Corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunion Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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AP Dupuytren's contracture
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Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain

Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email By Gabrielle Kassel, August 20, 2020 August 20, 2020 Carpal tunnel syndrome, one of the most phonetically pleasing health conditions in the English language, affects the wrists. As many as 10 million Americans — that’s about 3 percent of the population — have some degree of this condition. Carpal tunnel can cause quite a bit of pain and discomfort, and considering how much we use our wrists in day-to-day life, it’s important to address this condition if it’s affecting your quality of life. Stay tuned for the essential info, including five expert-approved exercises designed to help manage pain. What is it, exactly? Carpal tunnel syndrome happens when your median nerve, which runs along the underside of your forearm and up your hand through a tunnel of nine tendons called the carpal tunnel, gets squeezed or compressed. Experts aren’t totally sure what causes carpal tunnel, but one of the leading hypotheses is that it’s a type of anatomic compression and/or inflammation around the tendons. Symptoms of carpal tunnel There are many degrees of carpal tunnel syndrome, ranging from annoying to excruciating. Look out for these symptoms: • numbness, tingling, or jolts of pain in your thumb and first three fingers • pain that travels up and down your forearm • dull, constant, or even severe wrist pain • new-onset grip weakness 5 daily exercises that might do the trick Before we get into the exercises, we should note that the first line of defense in managing carpal tunnel is determining that you actually have it. And the only way to do that is by seeing a professional. How often should you do them? The recommended scheme in the exercises below was set by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. However, Alejandro Badia, M.D., board-certified hand, wrist, and upper extremity orthopedic surgeon is adamant you speak with a healthcare provider before starting this regimen. And if you experience any sort of sharp pain, stop immediately.   1. Wrist extension stretch Recommended reps: 5 Times per day: 4 Times per week: 5–7 “There’s some evidence that wrist extension and flexion exercises help widen the carpal tunnel a tiny little bit,” says Badia. How to do it 1. Straighten arm and bend wrist so fingers are pointed up and perpendicular to your forearm. (This should look like a “stop” sign.) 2. Use your opposite hand to apply pressure across your palm, pulling fingers toward you. 3. Hold for 15–30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.   2. Wrist flexion stretch Recommended reps: 5 Times per day: 4 Times per week: 5–7 Surprise: The wrist flexion stretch is basically the exact opposite of the wrist extension stretch. How to do it 1. Straighten arm and bend wrist down so palm is facing your body and fingers are pointed toward the floor, perpendicular to your forearm. 2. Use your opposite hand to pull fingers toward your body. 3. Hold for 15–30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.   3. Medial nerve glide Times per day: 10–15 Times per week: 6–7 True to its name, this exercise is all about getting the nerve moving and grooving through some gentle thumb manipulation. Doctor of physical therapy and founder of Just Move Therapy Dr. Marcia Darbouze, PT, DPT, adds this move is “awesome for relief.” How to do it 1. Start with wrist in a neutral position, palm facing away from you, and fingers curled into a fist. 2. Open your fist into a flat palm, with thumb glued against pointer finger, so wrist is parallel to the floor. 3. Bend wrist back toward you so the backs of your hand and fingers are facing your face. 4. “Unglue” thumb, extending it as far as you can away from palm. 5. Flip entire forearm so you’re now staring at palm and the underside of forearm 6. Use your other hand to gently pull down on thumb, giving it a nice stretch (but don’t pull too hard). 7. Repeat with the other hand.   4. Vertical tendon glides Recommended reps: 5–10 Times per day: 2 or 3 Times per week: Daily “Vertical and horizontal tendon gliding exercises really do seem to help people,” says Badia. How to do it 1. Start with hand in “stop” position, wrist neutral, and fingers straight. 2. Bend fingertips toward the floor so they’re touching your palm. Hold for 3 seconds. 3. Curl fingers into fist, with thumb on the outside. Hold for 3 seconds. 4. Repeat with the other hand.   5. Horizontal tendon glides Recommended reps: 5–10 Times per day: 2 or 3 Times per week: Daily And last one… How to do it 1. Start with hand in “stop” position. 2. Bend at bottom knuckle so fingers are perpendicular to palm. Hold for 3 seconds. 3. Touch fingertips to palm by hinging at middle knuckles. Hold for 3 seconds. 4. Repeat with the other hand These exercises aren’t for everyone According to physical therapist Lauren Jarmusz, these exercises may actually bring on some of your carpal tunnel symptoms. She recommends doing 1 rep of each and waiting 10 minutes to see if your symptoms resolve. If the pain and discomfort don’t ease, discontinue the exercises and make an appointment to see your doctor. What else can I do for my carpal tunnel? The protocols will vary based on your pain level but could include any combo of the following: Adjust your positioning At your desk 8+ hours a day? The quickest remedy for folks whose symptoms are aggravated by their job is a desk makeover. “Set up your workstation so that the monitor is eye level and an arm’s length away, the elbows are in line with the wrists, the mouse is nearby, the thighs are parallel to the floor, and the feet are planted,” suggests Darbouze. Splints “For early carpal tunnel syndrome, it’s very common for doctors to prescribe that a patient wear a

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carpal tunnel pain
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What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email By Sanctuary magazine staff November 2021 Carpal tunnel, which is a common nerve compression disorder causing pain, tingling and numbness in the wrist, hand and fingers, is an occupational disease, right? “Wrong,” says Alejandro Badia, M.D., a noted hand and upper limb specialist and founder and chief medical officer of the Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW®. He brands claims that carpal tunnel syndrome develops because of overuse of the wrist a “myth, much like saying cracking your knuckles leads to arthritis or eating chicken soup will cure the common cold.” The syndrome occurs when the median nerve, which extends from the forearm to the hand through the narrow tunnel of bone and ligaments on the wrist’s palm side, becomes pinched and inflamed from irritated tendons or other conditions that cause swelling and thickening of the connective tissue surrounding the nerve in the wrist canal. Dr. Badia explains that symptoms begin gradually and worsen over time. These symptoms include wrist or forearm pain; persistent burning, tingling or numbness in the fingers; and decreased hand and wrist strength. “CTS is an extremely common, readily diagnosable medical condition. However, it is often misunderstood, even by the scientific community,” Badia says. Recent studies bear him out. For example, the latest research, published in a July 2020 issue of Nature Communications indicates that genetics may play a much greater role in CTS than once thought. In analyzing nearly 100 cases of CTS in two families, scientists report finding mutations of a gene “highly expressed” in the tissue around the median nerve. The mutated gene is believed responsible for promoting an accumulation of cells that cause the connective tissue to thicken and press on the nerve. Study results could eventually lead to new treatments and preventive measures.  But genetics is only one culprit in a disorder considered multifactorial. The National Institutes of Health reports women are three times more likely than men to experience carpal tunnel syndrome. The higher risk among females is likely due to their anatomically narrower wrist channels and the disorder’s suspected relationship toVariations in the levels of these substances – such as what occurs in menopause and pregnancy – can lead to fluid retention and thicken the extracellular matrix in the wrist, resulting in pressure on the median nerve,” Badia says. Researchers say that other conditions increasing risk among both sexes are injuries to the wrist, obesity, inflammatory and nerve-related diseases like arthritis and diabetes, and a dysfunctional thyroid. The thyroid controls metabolism – how the body utilizes energy from food. Be cautious of hand position during sleep. Sleeping on flexed hands allows fluid to pool in the wrist canal. If directed by an orthopedic specialist, wear a wrist splint at night to relieve pressure on the wrist canal. Be aware of posture while walking or sitting Hunching places strain on arms, wrists and hands. Avoid bending the wrist too high or too low. Take breaks! Take Breaks when doing any prolonged activities involving hands or wrists Keep hands warm! Keep hands warm in a cold environment. Cold hands are a risk factor for CTS. Hormonal Changes can affect your hands! Because hormonal changes can cause fluid retention at night, women, in particular, should talk to their physicians about taking prescribed doses of vitamin B6, which some scientists believe decreases fluid in the carpal canal. “Repetitive wrist activities, such as typing on a computer keyboard or handling a cash register, may further aggravate CTS symptoms but are not linked to actual development of the disorder. Clinical research has failed to demonstrate conclusively any definned relationship between CTS and constant use of the wrist,” Dr. Badia indicates. “The ‘myth’ that workplace responsibilities somehow cause CTS has resulted in the misdirection of billions of dollars into workers’ compensation to treat a condition that commonly occurs in the general population. Alejandro Badia, M.DChief medical Officer at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center Also debunked by Badia are false beliefs that the only recourse for CTS is surgery, which frequently proves unsuccessful. In fact, initial, recommended therapies tend to be conservative. Depending on the severity of the condition, treatments can involve wrist splints at night, anti-inflammatory medications, performed in as little as ten minutes in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia. It involves dividing the ligament at the roof of the carpal tunnel to increase space in the canal and take pressure off the nerve,” Badia explains. “Postoperative complications are minimal and long-term results excellent.” He adds that recovery from this simple procedure is easy. For instance, a cardiothoracic surgeon had him perform the release on the morning he was attending a conference near Miami. Three days later, this same cardiothoracic surgeon flew to the Southwest city where he practices and performed a major thoracic surgery using the dominant affected hand. Numbness was gone. Carpal tunnel syndrome cannot always be prevented, but risks and symptoms may be reduced. Badia offers these tips to protect hands and wrists: “Most importantly, patients who are experiencing the classic symptoms of CTS should contact an orthopedic specialist as quickly as possible. If left untreated, the syndrome can eventually make it difficult to form a fist, coordinate fingers and do simple, manual tasks like buttoning a shirt or blouse. The disorder may even lead to a wasting of muscle at the base of the thumb and permanent nerve damage,” Badia cautions. View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Patient Articles Wrist Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Patient Articles Wrist What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand

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Hands of business man with pain, carpal tunnel syndrome or strain from corporate job, working or ty.
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Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness

Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email (HealthNewsDigest.com) – Miami, FL, June 4, 2019 – It is natural to want to ascribe a simple cause to a problem. If your wrist hurts or your hands are numb it must be because of typing. However, according to Alejandro Badia MD, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in treatment of the upper limbs, including hands and wrists says “don’t blame that painful wrist on any physical requirements of your job, including time spent on a computer keyboard or other device. That’s because the problem – carpal tunnel syndrome – is more likely due to hormonal changes, underlying inflammatory diseases or simple wrist anatomy”. The syndrome occurs when the median nerve, extending from the forearm to the hand through the narrow tunnel of bone and ligaments on the wrist’s palm side, becomes pinched and inflamed from irritated tendons or other conditions that cause swelling in the wrist canal. Symptoms, which begin gradually and worsen over time, include wrist or forearm pain; persistent burning, tingling or numbness in the fingers; and decreased hand strength, explains Dr. Badia, founder and chief medical officer of the Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW®, a group of walk-in orthopedic clinics. The National Institutes of Health reports women are three times more likely than men to experience carpal tunnel syndrome. The higher risk among females is likely due to their anatomically narrower wrist channels and the disorder’s suspected relationship to metabolic and hormonal-level changes during pregnancy and menopause, Dr. Badia says. “Hormones are chemical substances that impact every organ and structure in the body. Variations in the levels of these substances – such as what occurs in menopause and pregnancy — can lead to fluid retention and thicken the extracellular matrix in the wrist, resulting in pressure on the median nerve,” Dr. Badia says. Statistics indicate that 20 percent or more of pregnant women develop carpal tunnel syndrome. Other conditions increasing risk among both sexes, researchers say, are wrist injury, inflammatory and nerve-related diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes, and a dysfunctional thyroid. The thyroid controls metabolism – how the body utilizes energy from food. What studies fail to show conclusively is any defined relationship between constant use of the wrist and development of carpal tunnel syndrome, Dr. Badia indicates. “Repetitive wrist activities — like typing on a computer keyboard or handling a cash register — may further aggravate symptoms but are not linked to actual development of the syndrome,” he says. “The ‘myth’ that workplace responsibilities cause the problem has resulted in misdirection of billions of dollars into workers’ compensation to treat a condition that commonly occurs in the general population and is unrelated to on-the-job requirements.” In fact, carpal tunnel syndrome is described as far back as 1025 AD when medieval Persian physician, Avicenna, correctly detailed the wrist problem in his book Canon of Medicine,according to authors of a 2018 article in Integrative Medicine Research. Avicenna suggested that chronic nerve impingement in the wrist is due to both physical disorders and lifestyle factors, such as improper nutrition and lack of sleep. Whatever causes the syndrome, Dr. Badia encourages early diagnosis. “If left untreated, the syndrome can eventually make it difficult for patients to form a fist, coordinate their fingers and do simple, manual tasks like buttoning a shirt or blouse. The disorder may even lead to a wasting of muscle at the base of the thumb,” he says. Initial, recommended therapies tend to be conservative, involving wrist splints at night, anti-inflammatory medications and injection of corticosteroids. Some studies have supported the use of vitamin B6 and or B12. Should the problem persist, the nerve compression prove severe enough or a physician determine the syndrome is causing deterioration of hand muscles, then minor procedure may be proposed. “The procedure is performed in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia. It involves dividing the ligament that serves as the roof of the carpal tunnel to increase space in the wrist canal and take pressure off the nerve,” Dr. Badia says. “Using a recent treatment breakthrough called endoscopic release, the surgeon can divide the carpal tunnel ligament through a tiny cut in the crease of the wrist without making a larger, open incision,” Carpal tunnel syndrome cannot always be prevented, but risks may be reduced. Dr. Badia offers these tips: · Be cautious of hand position during sleep. When sleeping the hand is typically closer to the heart which can cause fluid to pool in the wrist canal. . · Relax grip when using tools, pens or other items. · Be aware of posture while walking or sitting. Hunching places strain on arms, wrists and hands. Avoid bending the wrist too high or too low. · Take breaks when doing any prolonged activities involving hands or wrists. · Keep hands warm in a cold environment. Cold hands are a risk factor for developing carpal tunnel syndrome.   Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, internationally renowned hand and upper-limb surgeon and founder of Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW®, a walk-in orthopedic care clinic. He is a member of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, American Association for Hand Surgery and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He is a specialist in treating all problems related to the hand and upper extremity including trauma, sports injury, joint reconstruction, nerve injuries and arthroscopic surgeries. View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, common conditions, Cubital tunnel, cubital tunnel syndrome, endoscopic, english, Hand, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, endoscopic carpal tunnel release, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Renowned hand and upper limb surgeon, Dr. Alejandro

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Bilateral endoscopic carpal tunnel release Dr. Badia
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Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain

Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email The Abaconian Staff May 15, 2016 According to the National Institutes of Health, carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common wrist conditions that exist with over 3 million cases reported yearly. The everyday symptoms that are easily ignored include burning, tingling, or itching numbness in the palm of the hand and index), the feeling of swelling without it being apparent, or the feeling of pins and needles, hand clumsiness or hand and wrist weakness. Although many people suffer from this condition, most do not know that there is a minimally invasive procedure that can eliminate these symptoms. This syndrome, which affects the hand and wrist, is caused by excessive pressure on the median nerve, which then causes a numbness and tingling feeling in the thumb, index, middle and ring or swelling (during pregnancy or after trauma /injury), tendon irritation (excessive or repetitive hand use), nerve changes (diabetes, hypothyroidism, or alcoholism),  arthritis, bone changes from arthritis, cysts or tumors. More severe cases may even experience different degrees of pain and discomfort as the muscle in the thumb becomes weak and decreases in size. syndrome, which affects the hand and wrist, is caused by excessive pressure on the median nerve, which then causes a numbness and tingling feeling in the thumb, index, middle and ring or swelling (during pregnancy or after trauma /injury), tendon irritation (excessive or repetitive hand use), nerve changes (diabetes, hypothyroidism, or alcoholism),  arthritis, bone changes from arthritis, cysts or tumors. More severe cases may even experience different degrees of pain and discomfort as the muscle in the thumb becomes weak and decreases in size. Dr. Alejandro Badia renowned Upper Extremity and Hand Surgeon, Medical Director of the Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and founder of OrthoNOW in Doral, Florida, specializes in minimally invasive procedures such as carpal tunnel release, which reduces pressure on the median nerve to alleviate the problem. The median nerve runs from the forearm to the carpal tunnel, which is composed of transverse carpal ligaments and carpal bones. It controls thumb movement and provides sensation from the palm side of the thumb “Endoscopy is minimally invasive, meaning patients are able to start their recovery sooner. By leaving little to no scarring, it reduces the risk of infection, which allows the patient to return to their life quickly and with a minimal amount of discomfort,” said Dr. Badia. Unlike open procedures, which are most common in the Caribbean, endoscopic procedures are much less painful, and the recovery and rehabilitation is a lot shorter. Patients from The Bahamas often travel to Miami for this reason. The procedure is done with local anesthesia and requires a three-day stay. Patients who undergo the procedure are able to use their hand immediately. View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Patient Articles Wrist Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, common conditions, Cubital tunnel, cubital tunnel syndrome, endoscopic, english, Hand, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Scientific Publications Wrist Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, endoscopic carpal tunnel release, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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Renowned hand and upper limb surgeon, Dr. Alejandro Badia from Miami, visits Freeport

Renowned hand and upper limb surgeon, Dr. Alejandro Badia from Miami, visits Freeport Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Submitted by Ana Garcia Thursday, 29 September 2011 07:17 MIAMI, FL – Dr. Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, and worldrenowned Hand and Upper Limb Surgeon, President of the ISSPOR TH (International Society for Sport Traumatology of the Hand), returns to Bahamas, this time to Freeport invited for a Medical Conference. Dr. Badia has recently performed three successful surgeries on the renowned biker Guilherme Berg (GUI BERG). “In 2010, I broke my right collarbone in the middle of the championship and I thought my year was over! I went back to see Dr. Badia, who six months earlier treated successfully my broken right wrist. He scheduled my surgery for the next day in his state of the art facility. One month and a half later I was racing again…. It was one of my best years in motorcycle racing so far; I won the Middleweight and Heavyweight Super Sport class, Middleweight Superbike class, CCS National Race of the Champions!! This year I broke my collarbone again! This time was the left one… Due to last year’s excellent results I went straight back to Dr. Badia’s center “again”. This time the fracture was much worse and still, barely a month later I’m back on the bike! – Affirms Mr. Berg. Dr. Badia says – “ It is extremely satisfactory when a professional athlete come to see me. It is imperative for them to be appropriately treated, to heal and go back to their intense routine. It is my challenge and my passion to succeed.” – Badia has a long history of treating high level tennis and golf competitors, NFL and NBA athletes. Dr. Badia has just been nominated one of the top 45 great hand and upper extremity surgeons to know by Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine Review. Alejandro Badia is in conversations with leading Brazilian medical authorities to organize a sports medicine conference prior to the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro. Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS is a hand and upper extremity surgeon. He studied physiology at Cornell University and obtained his medical degree at NYU, where he also trained in orthopedics. A hand fellowship at Alleghany General Hospital in Pittsburgh was followed by an AO trauma fellowship in Freiburg, Germany. He runs an active international hand fellowship, serves on the editorial board of two hand journals, and organizes a yearly Miami meeting for surgeons and therapists that are devoted to upper limb arthroscopy and arthroplasty (www.miamihandcourse.com). This international meeting is held at the world-renowned Miami Anatomical Research Center (M.A.R.C.), the world’s largest surgical cadaveric training lab that Dr. Badia co-founded in 2005. In 2008, he completed the Badia Hand to Shoulder Center, a fully integrated clinical facility for the upper limb encompassing digital radiography, MRI extremity imaging, Integral rehabilitation facility and the Surgery Center in Doral. More recently, Dr. Badia inaugurated OrthoNOW, the first immediateorthopedic care center in South Florida which is staffed by surgeons from the International Orthopedic Group (IOG), a group of surgeons from lower extremity, upper limb and spine subspecialties who also treat elective orthopedic problems in international patients. He is member of the ASSH, AAHS, AAOS as well as honorary member of many foreign hand surgery societies. View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Patient Articles Wrist Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, common conditions, Cubital tunnel, cubital tunnel syndrome, endoscopic, english, Hand, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Scientific Publications Wrist Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, endoscopic carpal tunnel release, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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Sports Injuries Of The Hand And Wrist: Renowned Orthopedic Surgeon Attends AAHS 2015 In Bahamas

Sports Injuries Of The Hand And Wrist: Renowned Orthopedic Surgeon Attends AAHS 2015 In Bahamas Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email MIAMI – Jan. 12, 2015 – PRLog — Dr. Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, Hand & Upper Limb Surgeon, who was recently proclaimed as “One of the Top Hand Surgeons in the United States”, Founder and Medical Director of Badia Hand to Shoulder Center, spokesperson and advocate on the latest in orthopedic technology: “ARPWAVE Neuro Therapy”, CEO of the OrthoNOW® Orthopedic Urgent Care franchise network, and past president of the ISSPORTH (International Society for Sport Traumatology of the Hand), arrives in Nassau, Bahamas serving as one of the opening speakers at the American Association for Hand Surgery 2015 Annual Meeting. This prominent meeting will begin with a notable presentation by Dr. Badia, on the latest in “Maximizing Economics in a Changing Health Care Environment” and “Sports Injuries of the Hand and Wrist”at Atlantis Hotel, Paradise Island on January 21st, 2015 at 7:00am. In today’s constantly changing health care environment, understanding and maximizing economics while enhancing patient hand and wrist care can be challenging. During this meeting, Dr. Alejandro Badia will be identifying the barriers to navigating through the ever-changing health care environment by presenting a solution of coordinated, convenient, responsive, affordable and expert orthopedic urgent care, and speak on common athletic injuries of the hand and wrist. Dr. Badia will also take this opportunity to attend various meetings with the media and local prominent figures. “I’m so pleased to be in beautiful Bahamas. My mission has been, and always is to create educational synergy and to expose great technology that allows minimally invasive procedure accelerates recovery, prevents some surgical procedures, and shortens post-surgical rehabilitation. This system provides our patients, mostly athletes who depend so much on their physical excellence, with better healthcare and better recovery methods and options.”–states Dr. Badia, Hand and Upper Limb Surgeon at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center in Miami, Florida. Badia has successfully performed surgery on many professional athletes from around the world. Traumatic (acute) refers to any specific, sharp pain that is of rapid onset or pain that results from a specific traumatic incident such as an athletic injury. Traumatic injuries are more commonly seen in athletes who participate in certain sports that require a higher level of contact (i.e., football, hockey, or wrestling). The most common traumatic fracture injury in the athletic population is found in the fingers and include joint dislocations, sprains, muscle strains, broken bones, tendon inflammation, and ligament tears. “Major fractures of the hand or wrist occur only during high-speed contact or in older athletes who may have osteoporosis.  Complex fractures below the elbow can occur and there is a great variation in the fracture patterns.  It is important that an upper extremity specialist evaluate these injuries, as recovery of full wrist and hand range of motion is often difficult.  Fractures of the upper arm (humerus) may also result from this injury and can even extend into the shoulder joint.” – States Dr. Alejandro Badia, Leading Hand and Upper Extremity Surgeon at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center. Overuse (chronic) injuries are more likely to occur in athletes who engage in sports that require them to repeat a particular movement (i.e., baseball, soccer, tennis, or golf). Overuse injuries are likely to be stress induced and include tendon inflammation and dislocation, nerve injury, and overuse stress fractures. Chronic injuries have a higher tendency to develop long-term effects. However, long-term disability is less likely to occur from overuse injuries than from traumatic injuries. An athlete’s performance may significantly diminish, if the chronic injuries are left untreated. Surgery may be required if the overuse chronic injuries persists and continues to develop over time. “Arthroscopy for hand and wrist pathology is a minimally invasive surgical technique used to explore a joint from within. Tiny incisions are used to insert a fiberoptic instrument which serves as a camera to the inside of a joint and allows to not only diagnose a problem but often times concludes what definitive treatment should would be best for the patient. This is opposed to the more standard technique of open joint surgery, which can result in increased scarring and prolonged recovery time. ” – States Dr. Alejandro Badia. Badia has a long history of treating high-level tennis, polo and golf competitors, NFL and NBA athletes. Dr. Badia was nominated in 2012 as “one of the top 45 great hand and upper extremity surgeons” by Becker’s Orthopedic & Spine Review. Alejandro Badia is in conversations with leading Brazilian medical authorities to organize a sports medicine conference prior to the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro. Article Reference: https://www.prlog.org/12413361-sports-injuries-of-the-hand-and-wrist-renowned-orthopedic-surgeon-attends-aahs-2015-in-bahamas.html View the original publication below: Powered By EmbedPress Related Articles: Blog Sports Injuries Of The Hand And Wrist: Renowned Orthopedic Surgeon Attends AAHS 2015 In Bahamas Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine Blog Renowned orthopaedic expert attends 2015 Hand Surgery meeting in the Bahamas arthroscopy, Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, Elbow Fracture, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine Patient Articles Wrist Wrist Pain in Golfers and Tennis Players Bahamas, english, Golf, sports injuries, Sports Therapy, Tennis, wrist Blog Miami Hand Surgeon Visits the Bahamas AAHS, Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, blog, english, hand surgeon, sports injuries, Sports Therapy Want to see more articles? 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Renowned orthopaedic expert attends 2015 Hand Surgery meeting in the Bahamas

Renowned orthopaedic expert attends 2015 Hand Surgery meeting in the Bahamas – The Tribune Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email DR ALEJANDRO Badia, recognised as one of the top hand surgeons in the United States, will serve as a opening speaker at the American Association for Hand Surgery 2015 Annual Meeting scheduled to be held in Nassau tomorrow morning. He will be giving a presentation on the latest in “Maximising Economics in a Changing Health Care Environment” and “Sports Injuries of the Hand and Wrist” at Atlantis starting at 7am. During the meeting, Dr Badia, who is the founder and medical director of Badia Hand to Shoulder Centre in Florida, will be identifying the barriers to navigating through the ever-changing health care environment by presenting a solution of coordinated, convenient, responsive, affordable and expert orthopaedic urgent care, and speak on common athletic injuries of the hand and wrist. “I’m so pleased to be in beautiful Bahamas,” he said. “My mission has been and always is to create educational synergy and to expose great technology that allows minimally invasive procedure accelerates recovery, prevents some surgical procedures, and shortens post-surgical rehabilitation. This system provides our patients, mostly athletes who depend so much on their physical excellence, with better healthcare and better recovery methods and options.” Dr Badia has successfully performed surgery on many professional athletes from around the world, including on high-level tennis, polo, golf, NFL and NBA players. “Major fractures of the hand or wrist occur only during high-speed contact or in older athletes who may have osteoporosis,” he said. “Complex fractures below the elbow can occur and there is a great variation in the fracture patterns. It is important that an upper extremity specialist evaluate these injuries, as recovery of full wrist and hand range of motion is often difficult. Fractures of the upper arm (humerus) may also result from this injury and can even extend into the shoulder joint.” Traumatic (acute) refers to any specific, sharp pain that is of rapid onset or pain that results from a specific traumatic incident such as an athletic injury. Traumatic injuries are more commonly seen in athletes who participate in certain sports that require a higher level of contact (football, hockey or wrestling). The most common traumatic fracture injury in the athletic population is found in the fingers and include joint dislocations, sprains, muscle strains, broken bones, tendon inflammation and ligament. Overuse (chronic) injuries are more likely to occur in athletes who engage in sports that require them to repeat a particular movement (baseball, soccer, tennis or golf). Overuse injuries are likely to be stress induced and include tendon inflammation and dislocation, nerve injury, and overuse stress fractures. Chronic injuries have a higher tendency to develop long-term effects. However, long-term disability is less likely to occur from overuse injuries than from traumatic injuries. An athlete’s performance may significantly diminish, if the chronic injuries are left untreated. Surgery may be required if the overuse chronic injuries persists and continues to develop over time. “Arthroscopy for hand and wrist pathology is a minimally invasive surgical technique used to explore a joint from within. Tiny incisions are used to insert a fibreoptic instrument which serves as a camera to the inside of a joint and allows to not only diagnose a problem but often times concludes what definitive treatment should would be best for the patient. This is opposed to the more standard technique of open joint surgery, which can result in increased scarring and prolonged recovery time,” said Dr Badia. Dr Badia was nominated in 2012 as “one of the top 45 great hand and upper extremity surgeons” by Becker’s Orthopaedic & Spine Review. He is also in conversations with leading Brazilian medical authorities to organise a sports medicine conference prior to the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro. As time goes on, Badia hopes to see his line of medicine considered a primary source of medical care. “There’s so much to think about when you get injured, and seeing the right person quickly can make a big difference. If you can save money along the way, it’s really a win-win,” he says. “We are a more cost-effective solution with the potential to make a huge dent on the overall health care system.” Article Reference: http://www.tribune242.com/news/2015/jan/20/renowned-orthopaedic-expert-attends-2015-hand-surg/ Related Articles: Blog Patient Articles Wrist Is WFH Sparking Your Carpal Tunnel? 9 Ways to Curb the Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist What’s Really Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, english, Hand, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Patient Articles Wrist Don’t Blame Your Job or Screens for That Painful Wrist or Hand Numbness Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, common conditions, Cubital tunnel, cubital tunnel syndrome, endoscopic, english, Hand, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Blog Scientific Publications Wrist Endoscopic Procedure for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Fast Recovery with Less Pain Athletic injuries | Sports Injuries | Sports Therapy, Bahamas, carpal tunnel, carpal tunnel syndrome, common conditions, endoscopic, endoscopic carpal tunnel release, english, Nassau, sports injuries, sports medicine, wrist Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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Renowned Hand And Wrist Surgeon Discusses Athletic Wrist Injuries
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Miami Hand Surgeon Visits the Bahamas

“My mission has been, and always is to create educational synergy and to expose great technology that allows minimally invasive procedure, accelerates recovery, prevents some surgical procedures, and shortens post-surgical rehabilitation.”   Dr. Alejandro Badia Transforming Athlete Care: Dr. Badia’s Renowned Expertise in Hand and Upper Limb Surgery Sets a New Standard “I make myself very available to my colleagues, not only here in The Bahamas but around the Caribbean.  I see a lot of patients from Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago.  So, what we do through my website, I’ll have a lot of colleagues send me an x-ray and say ‘What are your thoughts on this?’ Badia also mentioned that distal-radius (broken wrist) is one of the most common adult fracture that would need surgery. “That’s an extremely common fracture.  You see it a lot in older patients because of osteoporosis and you see it in athletes from a high-energy injury such as a fall.  And even in labor, people fall from a ladder or roof.  So, these are all very common. “But the difference in an athlete is they need to get back to their former level of functioning.  It’s important that they have the optimal treatment.  But today at the hotel I saw a lady who had a fracture several weeks ago and still hasn’t had surgery. “These things should be done within the first week or 10 days of the injury, because after that the bone starts to heal in the wrong position… So, again, it’s all a matter of awareness.”   MORE IN THE BAHAMAS: Dr. Alejandro Badia: Pioneering Orthopedic Care and Education in Hand and Upper Limb Surgery Dr. Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, hand and upper limb surgeon was one of the keynote speakers at the 2015 American Association for Hand Surgery Annual Meeting this past Wednesday. The meeting took place at the Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island; however, Badia was  available to speak with The Freeport News briefly. “I’m so pleased to be in beautiful Bahamas. My mission has been, and always is to create educational synergy and to expose great technology that allows minimally invasive procedure, accelerates recovery, prevents some surgical procedures, and shortens post-surgical rehabilitation. “This system provides our patients, mostly athletes who depend so much on their physical excellence, with better healthcare and better recovery methods and options,” stated Dr. Badia, Hand and Upper Limb Surgeon at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center in Miami, Florida. Badia has successfully performed surgery on many professional athletes from around the world. Badia, MD, FACS, Hand & Upper Limb Surgeon, was recently proclaimed, “One of the top hand surgeons in the United States.” He is the founder and Medical Director of Badia Hand to Shoulder Center, spokesperson and advocate on the latest in orthopedic technology: “ARPWAVE Neuro Therapy” and CEO of the OrthoNOW® Orthopedic Urgent Care franchise network. Badia is also the past president of the International Society for Sport Traumatology of the Hand (ISSPORTH), which is a society that came into being to educate athletes into seeing the right type of doctor when it comes to matters of the hand and wrist. He noted that a part of his address was the common injuries to the hand and wrist that athletes can suffer, and also the proper ways of seeking the right help and rehabilitation. Badia stated that injuries to the hand and wrist, is a topic not commonly spoken about when it comes to athletes. “It’s kind of a rarely discussed subject.  We always talk about hands and knees and ankle injuries and maybe shoulders, but we rarely talk about hand and wrist, and that’s what the symposium was about. “One of the issues is when an athlete, it doesn’t have to be a professional athlete, it can be people like you and I who like to do certain sports.  When we have a problem with our hand our wrist we often go to see a general doctor or we may even see an orthopedist, but the orthopedist doesn’t usually have that expertise in the hand or the wrist,” Badia indicated. Badia’s recommendation for anybody with a wrist injury or problem was simple, and that is seeking the right kind help as quickly as possible. “You really want to see the right type of doctor so if there is an acute injury, meaning a bad fall during sports, you want to get help pretty quickly and you want to make sure that the person you’re seeing has expertise in that area. “If you got something that’s been hurting for quite some time, and you’ve got the luxury of finding the right person, you can look online obviously, but you want to make sure it’s a specialist.  I think the problem is that the public thinks the orthopedic surgeon is a specialist.  We are, but now-a-days a spine surgeon is very different from what I do in hand wrist surgery which is different from a foot and ankle surgery. “So, my recommendation to people who want to get back to the same level of play for sports is that they seek the right person and I think the public, until now, didn’t really know there was a subspecialty called hand surgery,” Badia admitted. Badia made it known that he in fact knows a few, very good orthopedists in New Providence, but says it can be difficult to launch a sub-specialty in small countries. .“I know some very fine orthopedists here in Nassau, but the problem many times in smaller countries it’s hard to be able to develop a sub specialty because you may not have enough patients in the immediate area to focus on hand and wrist. “So, what I do recommend to the orthopedists is when they go to these conferences to attend some of the symposiums that are of that area which they’re a little weaker on.

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Get back in the saddle Dr. Badia hand to shoulder surgeon treats polo athletes
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Polo & Equestrian Injuries to the Upper Limbs

“GET BACK IN THE SADDLE” – Polo & Equestrian Injuries to the Upper Limbs   This article was first published on Polo Barbados 2014 Edition. You can read here testimonials from polo players such as Monique Archer and Danny Atwell. The article is still very relevant today not only for polo players but also for golf players and other competitive and recreational sports’ players. If you are suffering pain in your upper limbs, no matter the level of injury, please read on, and call our office. You are never late for a precise treatment that would maximize your return to full function.   While competitive and recreational polo rely significantly upon core and lower extremity strength and endurance, it is actually the upper extremity, which is usually involved in traumatic, or overuse injuries. This is due to the simple fact that the legs are constrained in the stirrups, and the participant has to use the upper limb to cushion a fall and hopefully roll. Besides injuries from a fall or collision, there are a wide variety of both traumatic and atraumatic injuries involving the hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder region due to the demanding use of the mallet. Fortunately, most of these injuries will not prevent the athlete from returning to their sport. Studies on incidence of polo injuries indicate that 40% involve the upper limb with facial lacerations being the second most common category of injury. It is, of course, head and cervical spine injuries that are the true danger. Fortunately, the majority of these can be prevented by the simple use of a helmet and a face protector. However, protective gear is not practical for the upper limb since hand, wrist and elbow mobility is critical to performing the complex functions of riding and wielding the polo mallet. Traumatic injuries are most common. However, there are certain chronic injuries or conditions that can develop with the prolonged awkward position required during riding. Gripping the reigns and mallet can aggravate tendinitis usually involving the flexor tendons. Carpal tunnel syndrome, which is a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, can be exacerbated by the functions required of various equestrian related sports including polo. This requires evaluation by a hand surgeon or a neurologist and simple nerve conduction studieswill establish the diagnosis. The definitive treatment is, despite popular opinion, quite simple. This involves release of the transverse carpal ligament,which is a 5-minute outpatient surgical procedure under local anesthesia that is often done endoscopically. It is an unfortunate myth that the public has been led to believe that this is due to typing or computer use. Other chronic conditions such as lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) as well as shoulder bursitis can often be aggravated and conservative treatment usually suffices. While tennis and golf are traditionally associated to these chronic tendinopathies, gripping the reigns for hours can exacerbate the rider predisposed to this common condition. Failure of conservative treatment via ice, stretching or rehab is now an indication for the FAST procedure, a minimally invasive solution involving high energy ultrasound to eliminate the non-healing tendinous tissue, allowing competitors to get back to riding within 1-2 weeks. Osteoarthritis, particularly at the base of the thumb, as is common in middle-aged women, is aggravated by hand positioning during riding. The key for these chronic injuries is to be evaluated by a hand and upper extremity specialist because these diagnoses are often less clear-cut. The upper limb fractures are obviously less subtle in their diagnosis. The classic fracture discussed amongst horse riders and polo athletes is that of the collarbone, or clavicle. This occurs when the rider is thrown and the resultant force on the armand shoulder girdle leads to a break in this bone. Fortunately,most clavicle fractures are treated conservatively with a sling or in youngsters, a figure-eight-type brace, but it has become increasingly common to perform operative reduction of these fractures in order to achieve the best result. Lance Armstrong has brought this fracture to public eye when he returned to competitive cycling only 3 weeks after plate/screw stabilization of this common injury also ubiquitous in cycling. Muchmore frequent than the commonly seen collarbone fracture are fractures about the wrist. Themost common would be a fracture of the distal radius, which is the spongy bone portion of the forearm where it meets the hand, and is far-and-away the most common fracture seen in the adult population in general. Treatment of these fractures has been revolutionized by a newmethod of fixation that was developed by my previous colleagues and I over 10 years ago. This involves an anatomic correction of the displaced bone and placement of a titanium plate and screws on the palmar aspect of the wrist that fixate the bone in the anatomic position. This allows for rapid recovery of function with essentially no long-termdeficit. Riders can return to their sport within several months after this injury using this new technique. However, themost classic polo injury about the wrist is the dreaded scaphoid fracture that is now managed with a compression screw to allow early motion and avoid stiffness and atrophy from prolonged casting. Until recently, there was a high incidence of scaphoid nonunions where the fracture never heals and leads to chronic issues in the wrist that needs more aggressive reconstruction. The current protocol of offering early percutaneous (tiny incision) screw fixation has minimized these complications and is preferable for the athlete who wants to get back in the saddle sooner. More subtle injuries to the wrist include ligament tears between the small carpal bones,which require an astute examination by a wrist specialist in order to establish a diagnosis. This is the most common cause of chronic wrist pain and is an entity that requires careful attention. The clinician should be experienced in wrist arthroscopy since this is the only sure way to establish the diagnosis, and can offer minimally invasive treatment. The smaller bones in the hand can also be involved in trauma from a fall or

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Artículos de Pacientes

Frequent Finger Injuries Among Cricketers

Frequent Finger Injuries Among Bahamian Cricketers Traumatic sports Injuries to the fingers and thumb are commonly occurring, occasionally career ending,  lesions to the competitive athlete, particularly cricket players. While often neglected, these injuries can occur in both contact and non-contact sports due to the crucial role the hand plays in many sporting activities. Unfortunately, these rarely receive much attention by the trainer or traditional team doctor, and it is only when the pain, swelling and functional deficit persist that the patient is referred to the hand surgeon specialist. The injury is often given the misnomer “jammed finger”, yet a clear diagnosis is rarely established, and this can have disastrous long term consequences to hand function and consequently, athletic performance. Digital injuries usually occur via an axial impaction mechanism in ball sports, while twisting injuries are seen more in contact sports. Regardless, the injuries can range from simple collateral ligament sprains, to tendon avulsions, or even complex articular fractures. The exact diagnosis will determine treatment and the time of return to sport. Thumb injuries overwhelmingly occur at the critical MCP joint, with ligamentous injuries requiring careful deliberation if operative intervention is needed. Early assessment will allow for the appropriate type and position of protective immobilization, often allowing continued play. More severe injuries, requiring surgical intervention, are also best treated early as this will lead to the best possible result and then allow faster return to competition.  Articular fractures of the PIP joint are good examples, in that delayed recognition will completely alter the treatment options. For example, a complex fracture dislocation may be amenable to dynamic external fixation if assessed within first ten days, but delayed evaluation and treatment may then require a less predictable reconstruction, such as hemi-hamate arthroplasty. Arthroscopy, particularly at the finger or thumb MCP joint, provides a less invasive and more accurate way of assessing chronic pain issues at this joint. Acute injury, such as a bony gamekeeper’s fracture, can also be more optimally treated via arthroscopy, avoiding the scar formation that can delay recovery and return of necessary motion. Finger injuries are commonly seen in Bahamian cricket athletes and early recognition is key. Team physicians, trainers, coaches and cricket players themselves must learn that optimal long term function depends on early, accurate diagnosis and the hand specialist should be involved from the onset. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Resection of Dorsal Wrist Ganglia Scientific Publications Wrist Resection of Dorsal Wrist Ganglia A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture Scientific Publications Wrist A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture Corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunion Scientific Publications Wrist Corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunion Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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