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Tag: finger

Live surgery tuesday with Dr. Badia
Finger Surgical Videos

Live surgery tuesday: 3rd & 4th Phalanx ORIF

Live surgery tuesday at Badia Hand to shoulder center: Officer Ramirez 3rd & 4th phalanx ORIF Warning: Viewer discretion is advised, content is intended for medical education. 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Patient Testimonial Homodigital Island Flap by Dr. Badia
Finger Testimonials

Reverse-Flow Homodigital Island Flap Testimonial

Reverse-Flow Homodigital Island Flap by Dr. Badia “Dr. Badia Is A Miracle Worker” – Patient L.C after her finger reconstruction Indications for a reverse-flow homodigital island flap A reverse-flow homodigital island flap is a surgical technique used in reconstructive hand surgery to repair tissue defects or injuries in the fingers. This flap is called “reverse-flow” because it involves using the artery and vein on the same side of the finger as the flap. Here are the indications for using a reverse-flow homodigital island flap: Soft Tissue Defects: Reverse-flow homodigital island flaps are primarily used to reconstruct soft tissue defects in the fingers. These defects may result from trauma, burns, infections, or tumor excisions. These flaps provide a reliable source of tissue to replace lost or damaged skin and subcutaneous tissue. Digital Replantation or Revascularization Failure: In cases where attempts to reattach or revascularize a severed or injured finger have failed, a reverse-flow homodigital island flap can be employed to cover the exposed bone, tendon, or neurovascular structures. It helps to promote wound healing and protect vital structures within the finger. Finger Pulp Reconstruction: The finger pulp is the soft, fleshy part at the fingertip. When this area is injured or degloved, it can lead to sensitivity and function loss. Reverse-flow homodigital island flaps can be used to reconstruct the finger pulp, restoring its contour, sensitivity, and function. Warning: Viewer discretion is advised, content is intended for medical education. Swipe to see before Intraop Photos Mathes Plastic Surgery Volume 7 The hand and upper limb Part 1 Chapter 172 Reconstructive surgery of individual digits ( Excluding Thumb) Roger K. Khouri, MD, FACS & Alejandro Badia, MD FACS Click here for the book Finger Content:

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Dr. Badia cross finger flap on patient from trinidad
Finger Surgical Videos

Surgical Content: Cross Finger Flap

cross finger flap Surgery with Dr. Badia Jetski injury on a patient from Trinidad Warning: Viewer discretion is advised, content is intended for medical education. What is a cross finger flap ? A “cross finger flap” is a surgical technique used in orthopedics and plastic surgery to reconstruct skin or tissue defects. This procedure involves taking a flap of healthy skin and tissue from one part of the body and transferring it to another, usually adjacent, area to repair the damaged or missing tissue. Click on the video below to watch a step by step demo with Dr. Badia.    https://vimeo.com/741242307?share=copy Click on images to enlarge Before finger flap by Dr. Badia Before finger flap by dr. badia patient from Trinidad Intraop insetting flap Suturing hypothenar skin graft Hypothenar Skin graft donor site International Patient Journey Mathes Plastic Surgery The Hand and Upper Limb PART 1 Read the first page Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Finger Content

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What is Trigger finger?
Fingers Video Education

What is Trigger Finger?

What is trigger finger? Explained by Dr. Badia Trigger finger, also known as stenosing tenosynovitis or trigger digit, is a condition that affects the fingers, particularly the thumb and the fingers closest to the thumb (index, middle, and ring fingers). It’s characterized by the inability to smoothly and comfortably flex or extend the affected finger, as if pulling a trigger, hence the name “trigger finger.” Here’s a detailed explanation of trigger finger: Causes: Trigger finger occurs when the tendons that enable the fingers to flex and extend become irritated or inflamed. These tendons glide through a narrow tunnel or sheath, which allows for smooth movement. When the sheath becomes inflamed or thickened, it can constrict the tendon’s movement, resulting in a finger that catches or locks in a bent position before suddenly releasing, like pulling a trigger. The exact cause can be due to overuse, repetitive hand movements, inflammatory conditions, or sometimes it can occur without a specific cause. Symptoms Catching or Locking: The finger may catch or lock in a bent position and then suddenly pop straight, often accompanied by a snapping or clicking sensation. Pain and Tenderness: There may be pain or tenderness at the base of the affected finger, especially when trying to move it. Stiffness: The finger may feel stiff, making it difficult to flex or extend it fully. Swelling: In some cases, there might be swelling or a bump at the base of the affected finger. Limited Mobility: The condition can lead to reduced finger mobility, making it challenging to perform tasks that require finger movement. Related: What is Trigger Finger? Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Badia Explains! What is Trigger Finger? Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Badia Explains! Trigger Finger Trigger Finger Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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finger injury thumbnail
Finger

Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think

Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Hand and Upper Limb Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Alejandro Badia Warns Time is of the Essence in Treating Finger Injuries; Offers Tips Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Experts call the finger’s middle joint “unforgiving” when injured. That’s why a digit jammed by a hard-thrown ball or smashed in a car door may be more than a “no-big-deal,” says hand and upper limb orthopedic surgeon and author of Healthcare from the Trenches, Dr. Alejandro Badia. Dr. Badia notes that this middle joint – the proximal interphalangeal joint or PIP – is what usually absorbs much of the impact from a blow and is most susceptible to trauma.  Dr. Badia adds that “”jammed finger” is a terrible and nonspecific misnomer. Using that term only describes the perceived mechanism of the injury, not at all the actual diagnosis like a fracture, dislocation or ligament or tendon injury. Oftentimes, it’s difficult to determine immediately whether the finger’s collateral ligaments have been simply overstretched or sprained by the injury or whether the joint has been dislocated or even fractured,” Dr. Badia says. The collateral ligaments are located on either side of the PIP and help support it. Dr. Badia warns that delays in diagnosis and treatment by an orthopedic specialist can lead to complications, such as fibrosis and stiffness, reduction in the finger’s range of motion, degenerative arthritis of the joint, and finger-joint deformities, which may be difficult to later repair and can interfere with a person’s grasping abilities. In fact, scientists indicate the PIP provides as much as 85 percent of the motion required for gripping.  “Time is of the essence in seeking treatment,” says Dr. Badia, an expert in care of the hand, wrist, and other upper limb joints and founder and chief medical officer of the Florida-based Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW”. “Too many times, patients consider a finger injury as minor and avoid contacting a physician until days – even weeks afterwards – when pain and swelling persist in the joint, and the finger becomes increasingly stiff.” This is particularly true of athletes – or their trainers — who delay care or seek inappropriate treatments that can result in irreversible loss of motion and finger abnormalities, like swan neck deformity in which the finger becomes bent towards the palm of the hand, say authors of a report published in a 2018 issue of the journal Hand Clinics.  With the exception of the thumb, each finger comprises an intricate network of three bones (phalanxes), three joints, and upporting tissue, ligaments, blood vessels and nerves. “Diagnosing and treating injuries anywhere along this system can be difficult enough even for the experienced orthopedic specialist,” Dr. Badia says. “That’s why seeking treatment for a finger injury from hospital emergency physicians or family doctors unfamiliar with the complexities of the hand is not a recommended route of care.”  The PIP is a “hinge joint” that allows the finger to flex and extend. It is located between the knuckle (the metacarpophalangeal joint) and the distal joint at the fingertip. A blow or smash directly on the finger or stress unexpectedly placed on an extended finger can cause a wide diversity of PIP­related injuries.  A “sprained finger, for example, usually means one or both of the PIP’ s collateral ligaments have been stretched or partially torn because of some force that bent the finger too far sideways. Such sprains can be managed using “buddy taping,” in which the traumatized finger is taped with an adjoining healthy finger. “Buddy taping requires the patient to bend the injured finger when using the healthy one,” Dr. Badia explains. “Exercise of the injured finger early in recovery is important because the PIP joint can quickly become stiff when immobilized.”  A complete tear of one of the collateral ligaments may also be associated with a PIP dislocation or fracture, Dr. Badia explains. When the PIP is dislocated, the specialist attempts to maneuver bones back into position – a process called closed reduction. Dr. Badia emphasizes that “at no time should patients try to reduct a dislocation on their own. Doing so will likely result in only more damage to the joint.”  Should more conservative, non-surgical methods fail to resolve a PIP dislocation, then surgery – open reduction — may be necessary. Surgery also is likely needed if a PIP fracture has occurred, and the fracture is severe, complex, or unstable or if the PIP’ s volar plate, the thick ligament that joins a finger’s lower bone to the middle bone on the palm side of the hand, has completely ruptured. “Volar plate damage can occur when a finger is bent too far backwards,” Dr. Badia says.  Both closed reduction and surgical repair are generally followed by splinting of the injured finger and early post-operative therapy to maintain the finger’s range of motion, Dr. Badia states. Of course, the best recourse is simply to avoid finger and hand injuries, Dr. Badia says. He offers these tips:  Learn tool safety and use the right tool for the right job.  If the task calls for it, wear protective gloves.  Keep fingers away from the moving parts of any equipment. Remove decorative rings when engaged in sports or other potentially hazardous activities.  Consider strengthening finger grip as part of a routine exercise regimen.  If a finger is injured, apply ice, keep the digit elevated above the heart and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications to help reduce pain and swelling.  Dr. Badia adds that if young athletes sustain a “jammed finger” on the athletic field, “do NOT, above all, fall into the time honored trap (or urban legend) of “pull my finger” with your coach or teammate. This may worsen the soft tissue injury sustained.” “And remember, if symptoms persist for more than a few days, contact an orthopedic specialist for evaluation,” Dr. Badia says.  Trigger Finger Finger Patient Articles Trigger Finger Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger

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wrapped finger
Finger

Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains

“Jammed Finger” Definition and Treatment Offers Tips For Finger Injuries in General Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Scientific Publications

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woman holding hand/ injured fingers
Finger

Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care

Fractured or Dislocated, Injured Finger Needs Prompt and Specialized Care “(HealthNewsDigest.com) – Miami, FL, January 5, 2021 – “There is only a finger difference between a wise man and a fool,” according to Greek philosophy, but, if that finger is injured, “it’s the wise man who has a hand specialist check it out,” says orthopedic surgeon Alejandro Badia MD “The finger could be fractured, dislocated, or both and more subtle soft tissue injuries (ligaments/tendons) might be present, all of which can severely affect the long-term functioning of the hand if left untreated.” Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Scientific Publications

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Artículos de Pacientes

Frequent Finger Injuries Among Cricketers

Frequent Finger Injuries Among Bahamian Cricketers Traumatic sports Injuries to the fingers and thumb are commonly occurring, occasionally career ending,  lesions to the competitive athlete, particularly cricket players. While often neglected, these injuries can occur in both contact and non-contact sports due to the crucial role the hand plays in many sporting activities. Unfortunately, these rarely receive much attention by the trainer or traditional team doctor, and it is only when the pain, swelling and functional deficit persist that the patient is referred to the hand surgeon specialist. The injury is often given the misnomer “jammed finger”, yet a clear diagnosis is rarely established, and this can have disastrous long term consequences to hand function and consequently, athletic performance. Digital injuries usually occur via an axial impaction mechanism in ball sports, while twisting injuries are seen more in contact sports. Regardless, the injuries can range from simple collateral ligament sprains, to tendon avulsions, or even complex articular fractures. The exact diagnosis will determine treatment and the time of return to sport. Thumb injuries overwhelmingly occur at the critical MCP joint, with ligamentous injuries requiring careful deliberation if operative intervention is needed. Early assessment will allow for the appropriate type and position of protective immobilization, often allowing continued play. More severe injuries, requiring surgical intervention, are also best treated early as this will lead to the best possible result and then allow faster return to competition.  Articular fractures of the PIP joint are good examples, in that delayed recognition will completely alter the treatment options. For example, a complex fracture dislocation may be amenable to dynamic external fixation if assessed within first ten days, but delayed evaluation and treatment may then require a less predictable reconstruction, such as hemi-hamate arthroplasty. Arthroscopy, particularly at the finger or thumb MCP joint, provides a less invasive and more accurate way of assessing chronic pain issues at this joint. Acute injury, such as a bony gamekeeper’s fracture, can also be more optimally treated via arthroscopy, avoiding the scar formation that can delay recovery and return of necessary motion. Finger injuries are commonly seen in Bahamian cricket athletes and early recognition is key. Team physicians, trainers, coaches and cricket players themselves must learn that optimal long term function depends on early, accurate diagnosis and the hand specialist should be involved from the onset. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Resection of Dorsal Wrist Ganglia Scientific Publications Wrist Resection of Dorsal Wrist Ganglia A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture Scientific Publications Wrist A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture Corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunion Scientific Publications Wrist Corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunion Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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xray of finger pins
Finger

homodigital island transfer

Distal interphalangeal joint to proximal interphalangeal joint homodigital island transfer Article in Operative Techniques in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery · February 1997 Abstract: Reconstruction of the damaged proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint is a challenge in the young active patient. Arthrodesis is disabling and implant arthoplasty is not satisfactory. Microvascular transfer of the second toe PIP joint is technically demanding, requires sacrifice of the toe, and achieves only 40° of average arc of motion in most reported series. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint of the same digit is conveniently located for potential transfer and its loss is well tolerated. We hereby describe our technique of homodigital DIP to PIP joint island flap transfer. With this procedure, the traumatized digit serves as its own donor and no other digit or toe is compromised. It exchanges the DIP joint, which contributes only 15% to the digital flexion arc for the PIP joint whose functional contribution is 85%. In addition, it provides the opportunity to shorten the stiff finger, making it less prone to interfere with hand activities. It is currently our preferred procedure, and because of its excellent result, has superseded the microvascular toe joint transfer.    KEY WORDS: arthroplasty, vascularized grafts, finger joints, island flaps, microsurgery, finger movements  Download PDF here Cite this article: Khouri, Roger & Shin, Young-Jin & Badia, Alejandro & Orbay, Jorge. (1997). Distal interphalangeal joint to proximal interphalangeal joint homodigital island transfer. Operative Techniques in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 4. 12-16. 10.1016/S1071-0949(97)80013-3.  homodigital island transfer Finger Scientific Publications homodigital island transfer Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture Finger Scientific Publications Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture Fixation method for unstable bony mallet finger Finger Scientific Publications Fixation method for unstable bony mallet finger Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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pinning of metacarpal fracture
Finger

Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture

Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fractures Article in Operative Techniques in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery · November 2002 Abstract: Metacarpal shaft fractures are common but consensus on the best mode of treatment has not been established. Open reduction and internal fixation with plates or screws has been performed for severely displaced fractures. Unfortunately, extensor tendon adhesions and/or unsightly scars frequently follow this form of treatment. Percutaneous flexible intramedulary nailing of metacarpal fractures provides an alternative method that minimizes these problems. The technique is simple and provides the ability to lock the nails to control length and rotation. The nails are inserted using a manually operated slotted awl and usually in an anterograde direction to prevent soft tissue irritation around the metacarpophalangeal joints. This method utilizes flexible nails (1.5 and 1.0 mm.) and closed fluoroscopically assisted reduction. Rotationally unstable or fractures with a tendency to shorten can be locked proximally using a captured transverse pin which effectively controls length and rotation. Metacarpophalangeal flexion block splinting can be used postoperatively and the nails are routinely removed after fracture healing. Experience with this technique has been favorable as it avoids exposure of the fracture, dissection around the extensor mechanism, and scar problems. It has provided excellent functional results and has presented a low complication rate. Download PDF here Cite this article:  Orbay, Jorge & Badia, Alejandro & Indriago, Igor & Infante, Anthony & Khouri, Roger & Gonzalez, Eduardo & Fernandez, Diego. (2002). The Extended Flexor Carpi Radialis Approach: A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture. Techniques in hand & upper extremity surgery. 5. 204-11. 10.1097/00130911-200112000-00004.  homodigital island transfer homodigital island transfer Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture Fixation method for unstable bony mallet finger Fixation method for unstable bony mallet finger Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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Tag: finger

Live surgery tuesday with Dr. Badia
Finger Surgical Videos

Live surgery tuesday: 3rd & 4th Phalanx ORIF

Live surgery tuesday at Badia Hand to shoulder center: Officer Ramirez 3rd & 4th phalanx ORIF Warning: Viewer discretion is advised, content is intended for medical education. 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Patient Testimonial Homodigital Island Flap by Dr. Badia
Finger Testimonials

Reverse-Flow Homodigital Island Flap Testimonial

Reverse-Flow Homodigital Island Flap by Dr. Badia “Dr. Badia Is A Miracle Worker” – Patient L.C after her finger reconstruction Indications for a reverse-flow homodigital island flap A reverse-flow homodigital island flap is a surgical technique used in reconstructive hand surgery to repair tissue defects or injuries in the fingers. This flap is called “reverse-flow” because it involves using the artery and vein on the same side of the finger as the flap. Here are the indications for using a reverse-flow homodigital island flap: Soft Tissue Defects: Reverse-flow homodigital island flaps are primarily used to reconstruct soft tissue defects in the fingers. These defects may result from trauma, burns, infections, or tumor excisions. These flaps provide a reliable source of tissue to replace lost or damaged skin and subcutaneous tissue. Digital Replantation or Revascularization Failure: In cases where attempts to reattach or revascularize a severed or injured finger have failed, a reverse-flow homodigital island flap can be employed to cover the exposed bone, tendon, or neurovascular structures. It helps to promote wound healing and protect vital structures within the finger. Finger Pulp Reconstruction: The finger pulp is the soft, fleshy part at the fingertip. When this area is injured or degloved, it can lead to sensitivity and function loss. Reverse-flow homodigital island flaps can be used to reconstruct the finger pulp, restoring its contour, sensitivity, and function. Warning: Viewer discretion is advised, content is intended for medical education. Swipe to see before Intraop Photos Mathes Plastic Surgery Volume 7 The hand and upper limb Part 1 Chapter 172 Reconstructive surgery of individual digits ( Excluding Thumb) Roger K. Khouri, MD, FACS & Alejandro Badia, MD FACS Click here for the book Finger Content:

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Dr. Badia cross finger flap on patient from trinidad
Finger Surgical Videos

Surgical Content: Cross Finger Flap

cross finger flap Surgery with Dr. Badia Jetski injury on a patient from Trinidad Warning: Viewer discretion is advised, content is intended for medical education. What is a cross finger flap ? A “cross finger flap” is a surgical technique used in orthopedics and plastic surgery to reconstruct skin or tissue defects. This procedure involves taking a flap of healthy skin and tissue from one part of the body and transferring it to another, usually adjacent, area to repair the damaged or missing tissue. Click on the video below to watch a step by step demo with Dr. Badia.    https://vimeo.com/741242307?share=copy Click on images to enlarge Before finger flap by Dr. Badia Before finger flap by dr. badia patient from Trinidad Intraop insetting flap Suturing hypothenar skin graft Hypothenar Skin graft donor site International Patient Journey Mathes Plastic Surgery The Hand and Upper Limb PART 1 Read the first page Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Finger Content

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What is Trigger finger?
Fingers Video Education

What is Trigger Finger?

What is trigger finger? Explained by Dr. Badia Trigger finger, also known as stenosing tenosynovitis or trigger digit, is a condition that affects the fingers, particularly the thumb and the fingers closest to the thumb (index, middle, and ring fingers). It’s characterized by the inability to smoothly and comfortably flex or extend the affected finger, as if pulling a trigger, hence the name “trigger finger.” Here’s a detailed explanation of trigger finger: Causes: Trigger finger occurs when the tendons that enable the fingers to flex and extend become irritated or inflamed. These tendons glide through a narrow tunnel or sheath, which allows for smooth movement. When the sheath becomes inflamed or thickened, it can constrict the tendon’s movement, resulting in a finger that catches or locks in a bent position before suddenly releasing, like pulling a trigger. The exact cause can be due to overuse, repetitive hand movements, inflammatory conditions, or sometimes it can occur without a specific cause. Symptoms Catching or Locking: The finger may catch or lock in a bent position and then suddenly pop straight, often accompanied by a snapping or clicking sensation. Pain and Tenderness: There may be pain or tenderness at the base of the affected finger, especially when trying to move it. Stiffness: The finger may feel stiff, making it difficult to flex or extend it fully. Swelling: In some cases, there might be swelling or a bump at the base of the affected finger. Limited Mobility: The condition can lead to reduced finger mobility, making it challenging to perform tasks that require finger movement. Related: What is Trigger Finger? Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Badia Explains! What is Trigger Finger? Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Badia Explains! Trigger Finger Trigger Finger Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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finger injury thumbnail
Finger

Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think

Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Hand and Upper Limb Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Alejandro Badia Warns Time is of the Essence in Treating Finger Injuries; Offers Tips Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Experts call the finger’s middle joint “unforgiving” when injured. That’s why a digit jammed by a hard-thrown ball or smashed in a car door may be more than a “no-big-deal,” says hand and upper limb orthopedic surgeon and author of Healthcare from the Trenches, Dr. Alejandro Badia. Dr. Badia notes that this middle joint – the proximal interphalangeal joint or PIP – is what usually absorbs much of the impact from a blow and is most susceptible to trauma.  Dr. Badia adds that “”jammed finger” is a terrible and nonspecific misnomer. Using that term only describes the perceived mechanism of the injury, not at all the actual diagnosis like a fracture, dislocation or ligament or tendon injury. Oftentimes, it’s difficult to determine immediately whether the finger’s collateral ligaments have been simply overstretched or sprained by the injury or whether the joint has been dislocated or even fractured,” Dr. Badia says. The collateral ligaments are located on either side of the PIP and help support it. Dr. Badia warns that delays in diagnosis and treatment by an orthopedic specialist can lead to complications, such as fibrosis and stiffness, reduction in the finger’s range of motion, degenerative arthritis of the joint, and finger-joint deformities, which may be difficult to later repair and can interfere with a person’s grasping abilities. In fact, scientists indicate the PIP provides as much as 85 percent of the motion required for gripping.  “Time is of the essence in seeking treatment,” says Dr. Badia, an expert in care of the hand, wrist, and other upper limb joints and founder and chief medical officer of the Florida-based Badia Hand to Shoulder Center and OrthoNOW”. “Too many times, patients consider a finger injury as minor and avoid contacting a physician until days – even weeks afterwards – when pain and swelling persist in the joint, and the finger becomes increasingly stiff.” This is particularly true of athletes – or their trainers — who delay care or seek inappropriate treatments that can result in irreversible loss of motion and finger abnormalities, like swan neck deformity in which the finger becomes bent towards the palm of the hand, say authors of a report published in a 2018 issue of the journal Hand Clinics.  With the exception of the thumb, each finger comprises an intricate network of three bones (phalanxes), three joints, and upporting tissue, ligaments, blood vessels and nerves. “Diagnosing and treating injuries anywhere along this system can be difficult enough even for the experienced orthopedic specialist,” Dr. Badia says. “That’s why seeking treatment for a finger injury from hospital emergency physicians or family doctors unfamiliar with the complexities of the hand is not a recommended route of care.”  The PIP is a “hinge joint” that allows the finger to flex and extend. It is located between the knuckle (the metacarpophalangeal joint) and the distal joint at the fingertip. A blow or smash directly on the finger or stress unexpectedly placed on an extended finger can cause a wide diversity of PIP­related injuries.  A “sprained finger, for example, usually means one or both of the PIP’ s collateral ligaments have been stretched or partially torn because of some force that bent the finger too far sideways. Such sprains can be managed using “buddy taping,” in which the traumatized finger is taped with an adjoining healthy finger. “Buddy taping requires the patient to bend the injured finger when using the healthy one,” Dr. Badia explains. “Exercise of the injured finger early in recovery is important because the PIP joint can quickly become stiff when immobilized.”  A complete tear of one of the collateral ligaments may also be associated with a PIP dislocation or fracture, Dr. Badia explains. When the PIP is dislocated, the specialist attempts to maneuver bones back into position – a process called closed reduction. Dr. Badia emphasizes that “at no time should patients try to reduct a dislocation on their own. Doing so will likely result in only more damage to the joint.”  Should more conservative, non-surgical methods fail to resolve a PIP dislocation, then surgery – open reduction — may be necessary. Surgery also is likely needed if a PIP fracture has occurred, and the fracture is severe, complex, or unstable or if the PIP’ s volar plate, the thick ligament that joins a finger’s lower bone to the middle bone on the palm side of the hand, has completely ruptured. “Volar plate damage can occur when a finger is bent too far backwards,” Dr. Badia says.  Both closed reduction and surgical repair are generally followed by splinting of the injured finger and early post-operative therapy to maintain the finger’s range of motion, Dr. Badia states. Of course, the best recourse is simply to avoid finger and hand injuries, Dr. Badia says. He offers these tips:  Learn tool safety and use the right tool for the right job.  If the task calls for it, wear protective gloves.  Keep fingers away from the moving parts of any equipment. Remove decorative rings when engaged in sports or other potentially hazardous activities.  Consider strengthening finger grip as part of a routine exercise regimen.  If a finger is injured, apply ice, keep the digit elevated above the heart and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications to help reduce pain and swelling.  Dr. Badia adds that if young athletes sustain a “jammed finger” on the athletic field, “do NOT, above all, fall into the time honored trap (or urban legend) of “pull my finger” with your coach or teammate. This may worsen the soft tissue injury sustained.” “And remember, if symptoms persist for more than a few days, contact an orthopedic specialist for evaluation,” Dr. Badia says.  Trigger Finger Finger Patient Articles Trigger Finger Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger

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wrapped finger
Finger

Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains

“Jammed Finger” Definition and Treatment Offers Tips For Finger Injuries in General Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Scientific Publications

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woman holding hand/ injured fingers
Finger

Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care

Fractured or Dislocated, Injured Finger Needs Prompt and Specialized Care “(HealthNewsDigest.com) – Miami, FL, January 5, 2021 – “There is only a finger difference between a wise man and a fool,” according to Greek philosophy, but, if that finger is injured, “it’s the wise man who has a hand specialist check it out,” says orthopedic surgeon Alejandro Badia MD “The finger could be fractured, dislocated, or both and more subtle soft tissue injuries (ligaments/tendons) might be present, all of which can severely affect the long-term functioning of the hand if left untreated.” Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger May Be a Bigger Deal Than You Think Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains Jammed Finger? Dr. Badia explains Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care Injured Fingers Need Specialized Care Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Scientific Publications

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Artículos de Pacientes

Frequent Finger Injuries Among Cricketers

Frequent Finger Injuries Among Bahamian Cricketers Traumatic sports Injuries to the fingers and thumb are commonly occurring, occasionally career ending,  lesions to the competitive athlete, particularly cricket players. While often neglected, these injuries can occur in both contact and non-contact sports due to the crucial role the hand plays in many sporting activities. Unfortunately, these rarely receive much attention by the trainer or traditional team doctor, and it is only when the pain, swelling and functional deficit persist that the patient is referred to the hand surgeon specialist. The injury is often given the misnomer “jammed finger”, yet a clear diagnosis is rarely established, and this can have disastrous long term consequences to hand function and consequently, athletic performance. Digital injuries usually occur via an axial impaction mechanism in ball sports, while twisting injuries are seen more in contact sports. Regardless, the injuries can range from simple collateral ligament sprains, to tendon avulsions, or even complex articular fractures. The exact diagnosis will determine treatment and the time of return to sport. Thumb injuries overwhelmingly occur at the critical MCP joint, with ligamentous injuries requiring careful deliberation if operative intervention is needed. Early assessment will allow for the appropriate type and position of protective immobilization, often allowing continued play. More severe injuries, requiring surgical intervention, are also best treated early as this will lead to the best possible result and then allow faster return to competition.  Articular fractures of the PIP joint are good examples, in that delayed recognition will completely alter the treatment options. For example, a complex fracture dislocation may be amenable to dynamic external fixation if assessed within first ten days, but delayed evaluation and treatment may then require a less predictable reconstruction, such as hemi-hamate arthroplasty. Arthroscopy, particularly at the finger or thumb MCP joint, provides a less invasive and more accurate way of assessing chronic pain issues at this joint. Acute injury, such as a bony gamekeeper’s fracture, can also be more optimally treated via arthroscopy, avoiding the scar formation that can delay recovery and return of necessary motion. Finger injuries are commonly seen in Bahamian cricket athletes and early recognition is key. Team physicians, trainers, coaches and cricket players themselves must learn that optimal long term function depends on early, accurate diagnosis and the hand specialist should be involved from the onset. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Resection of Dorsal Wrist Ganglia Scientific Publications Wrist Resection of Dorsal Wrist Ganglia A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture Scientific Publications Wrist A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture Corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunion Scientific Publications Wrist Corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunion Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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xray of finger pins
Finger

homodigital island transfer

Distal interphalangeal joint to proximal interphalangeal joint homodigital island transfer Article in Operative Techniques in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery · February 1997 Abstract: Reconstruction of the damaged proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint is a challenge in the young active patient. Arthrodesis is disabling and implant arthoplasty is not satisfactory. Microvascular transfer of the second toe PIP joint is technically demanding, requires sacrifice of the toe, and achieves only 40° of average arc of motion in most reported series. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint of the same digit is conveniently located for potential transfer and its loss is well tolerated. We hereby describe our technique of homodigital DIP to PIP joint island flap transfer. With this procedure, the traumatized digit serves as its own donor and no other digit or toe is compromised. It exchanges the DIP joint, which contributes only 15% to the digital flexion arc for the PIP joint whose functional contribution is 85%. In addition, it provides the opportunity to shorten the stiff finger, making it less prone to interfere with hand activities. It is currently our preferred procedure, and because of its excellent result, has superseded the microvascular toe joint transfer.    KEY WORDS: arthroplasty, vascularized grafts, finger joints, island flaps, microsurgery, finger movements  Download PDF here Cite this article: Khouri, Roger & Shin, Young-Jin & Badia, Alejandro & Orbay, Jorge. (1997). Distal interphalangeal joint to proximal interphalangeal joint homodigital island transfer. Operative Techniques in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 4. 12-16. 10.1016/S1071-0949(97)80013-3.  homodigital island transfer Finger Scientific Publications homodigital island transfer Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture Finger Scientific Publications Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture Fixation method for unstable bony mallet finger Finger Scientific Publications Fixation method for unstable bony mallet finger Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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pinning of metacarpal fracture
Finger

Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture

Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fractures Article in Operative Techniques in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery · November 2002 Abstract: Metacarpal shaft fractures are common but consensus on the best mode of treatment has not been established. Open reduction and internal fixation with plates or screws has been performed for severely displaced fractures. Unfortunately, extensor tendon adhesions and/or unsightly scars frequently follow this form of treatment. Percutaneous flexible intramedulary nailing of metacarpal fractures provides an alternative method that minimizes these problems. The technique is simple and provides the ability to lock the nails to control length and rotation. The nails are inserted using a manually operated slotted awl and usually in an anterograde direction to prevent soft tissue irritation around the metacarpophalangeal joints. This method utilizes flexible nails (1.5 and 1.0 mm.) and closed fluoroscopically assisted reduction. Rotationally unstable or fractures with a tendency to shorten can be locked proximally using a captured transverse pin which effectively controls length and rotation. Metacarpophalangeal flexion block splinting can be used postoperatively and the nails are routinely removed after fracture healing. Experience with this technique has been favorable as it avoids exposure of the fracture, dissection around the extensor mechanism, and scar problems. It has provided excellent functional results and has presented a low complication rate. Download PDF here Cite this article:  Orbay, Jorge & Badia, Alejandro & Indriago, Igor & Infante, Anthony & Khouri, Roger & Gonzalez, Eduardo & Fernandez, Diego. (2002). The Extended Flexor Carpi Radialis Approach: A New Perspective for the Distal Radius Fracture. Techniques in hand & upper extremity surgery. 5. 204-11. 10.1097/00130911-200112000-00004.  homodigital island transfer homodigital island transfer Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture Percutaneous fixation of metacarpal fracture Fixation method for unstable bony mallet finger Fixation method for unstable bony mallet finger Want to see more articles? BHS Blog Patient Articles

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